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Old Oct 21, 2010, 07:04 PM   #1
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Default Wilburys article from 1990

I need to type that up (Its part of The Petty Archives). If anyones interested I might post it when I done that (First I have to finish the other article Im working on. Its not a Wilbury article though)

http://books.google.com/books?id=fhs...rys%22&f=false
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 09:15 PM   #2
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Very cool article, thanks for posting Aimee . It makes one wanna play Volumer 3 again.

The author sure took her time to prepare this article, like where she refers to something as simple as Tom Petty singing "You took my breath away.... I want it back again".
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 09:20 PM   #3
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Glad its liked. I also got a 1989 article about Tom Petty that talks about the Wilburys. I think, August 1989 in Spin. I typed that already. Should I post that.
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 09:24 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by The New AimeeAndBeatles View Post
Should I post that.
Yes I'd like to read it but a google book version Link like this one here is fine and saves a lot of time.
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 09:29 PM   #5
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Well Ive actually got it typed. Its on google books tho'
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 09:40 PM   #6
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I need to post this in a few parts. Its a tad too long for one.


MLA Citation: Corcoran, Michael. "Raised on Promises." Spin Aug. 1989. Print.

Cover
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5

The article:
Quote:
Raised On Promises
Article By Michael Corcoran
Spin -- August 1989


Tom Petty has been a rebel and a Traveling Wilbury, a kid who saw Elvis at 7 and grew up to fight the record company on principle alone. He may be one of the great talents of his generation or just another creep from the Valley. He may be both.

Tom Petty drives a black Corvette Stingray. He could afford a much more expensive car, like a Ferrari, Rolls-Royce or Lamborghini, but as far as he's concerned, a black 'Vette is the ultimate set of wheels. It's the car he wanted when he was a 15-year-old in Gainesville, Florida.
We are driving down Ventura Boulevard, me and Tom Petty, in his black 'Vette. He apologizes for the car phone. "My manager said I should have one," he says, "but I don't know. I'd be so embarrassed if someone I knew saw me talking on it. I mean, what am I gonna do, call my wife and tell her I'll be home as soon as the light turns green?"
Tom Petty is the product of what he calls "swamp people." His father's mother is a full-blooded Cherokee. Petty grew up on the lower frontiers of the Okeefenokee swamp, in Gainesville, the home of the University of Florida. On the song, "A Mind With a Heart of Its Own," from Full Moon Fever, he sings, "Well I been to Brooker and I been to Micanopy/I been to St. Louis too/I been all around the world." Brooker and Micanopy are podunk suburbs of Gainesville; the small-town attitude is a subdivision of Petty's mind that has never been torn down. "Most people come to Florida to escape something -- cold weather, their past, whatever," he says. "And they're very content about it. I was always uncontent. I ran a little faster than Florida. When I left Gainesville in '74, it felt like I was escaping. It's always great to go back, though."
When I was 23, I camped out for tickets to see Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers at the Santa Monica Civic. Took the bus from Pico Rivera, waited in line for 12 hours, then found out it was unreserved seating. Color me chump. It was the best rock'n'roll show I've ever seen, though. God, what a magnificent rock'n'roll machine the Heartbreakers were/are. And Petty was the coolest -- the son Patti Smith gave away for adoption when she was 19, raised by swamp people and locked in a room with Between the Buttons and Blonde on Blonde. The day after the show, I bought a vest and started using conditioner.
As we drive through successive unexceptional blocks, Petty tells me that Ventura Boulevard is "the Broadway of the Valley." That A&P over there next to Popeye's must be Times Square. There is little distinguishable about these miracle miles except that all the first-run theaters are showing Field of Dreams and all the dollar houses are showing Bull Durham. Kevin Costner owns Ventura Boulevard this thick spring evening.
"I love LA," Petty says. "I love Florida, but LA is home now."
Petty first moved to LA in 1974 with Mudcrutch, a popular Florida bar band which also contained future Heartbreakers Benmont Tench and Mike Campbell. "Driving to LA was the funniest thing," Petty recalls with a great laugh. "I remember stopping the car in Arizona and getting out because we saw a cactus and couldn't believe it." The members of Mudcrutch knew even less about the music business than they did about southwestern vegetation. "We told them we drove all the way from Florida to LA as if we were the first people to drive 3,000 miles to go to Hollywood." Mudcrutch was quite good, though. They received three offers to sign after only a week, and chose Shelter. "We were so naive that when we signed a publishing deal we thought it meant for writing books."
When he first moved to LA, Petty hung around the Premiere Motel with the other Shelter acts -- Dwight Twilley, Phil Seymour, Gary Busey, Leon Russell -- just getting high and writing songs. "Hanging out with the Traveling Wilburys kinda reminds me of those days," he says. "Instead of sitting around the Premiere Motel amongst dirty socks, though, we're in our houses and studios in the Valley. The old spirit is still there. I guess Jeff (Lynne) is sorta the Leon Russell of this group. He's the producer, the catalyst. He makes sure our socks are clean."
Earlier in the day, when Petty met me at the MCA offices, it was the first time he'd been there in years. He's more ordinary when you'd expect, this simple rock millionaire. His face shows every day of his 35 years, with his hairline starting to recede, his skin wrinkling around his basset hound eyes, and his chin doubling. You always hear that rock stars are small in person, and you come to expect it. But when Petty walks into the room, not only short but frail, you're still surprised. His white, skinny fingers look barely big enough to play a guitar. He's been burned by words, so he approaches them cautiously, with long pauses and a still-recognizable drawl. He laughs long before he says something funny, and long after anyone else does. "In the early days," he says, "I badmouthed someone every once in a while, and then it would come out in the paper and I'd feel so small. I'd come off much worse than whoever I was talking about."
We pull into the parking lot of Norm's Rare Guitars in Reseda, which Petty calls the poor side of the tracks in the Valley. "The street that divides Encino and Reseda is a lot thicker than it looks," he says, "at least to some folks." The front door at Norm's says they close at 6:00, but we enter at around 6:30. Petty called and asked Norm to stay open, because we were running a little late. Norm knows on which side his croissant is buttered. As we get to the door, we run into Izzy Stradlin and Duff McKagan from Guns N'Roses, who recognize Petty and straighten up. "Man, Tom Petty," says McKagan, extending his hand. Petty's hands are so small that when he cups his ears you can still see his lobes. "We're in Guns N' Roses," Stradlin says, "and we think you're great." Petty smiles, says he's happy to meet them. After they tell him about seeing him at the US Festival or something they leave with their five new vintage guitars. "Can you believe those guys?" Petty asks, without shaking his head. "They're bigger than the Stones ever were." He likes Gun N' Roses mostly because they're from LA, but also because, like him, they took the best from their past and punched it into the present. As he's a Byrds with balls and legs, Guns N' Roses is Janis Joplin with the horsepower to bring that screech out of a skid.
"Norm, what do you want for this hollow-body?" Petty is strumming a huge blonde guitar that he could hide behind. "That one's a thousand," Norm answers. Petty gives him a look that says, "Are you serious, I wouldn't pay more than eight for this piece of shit." He puts the guitar down. Petty doesn't really want the big Gretsch, he's just setting Norm up for something he does want. It's a small Fender amp, which he tells me, when Norm is too far away to hear, is the first one he ever owned. As he plays "Don't Be Cruel" through the tiny Fender, he asks Norm, "How much for this amp?" Norm strokes his chin and says he'll sell the amp for a hundred and fifty. "Sold!" says Petty, perhaps a little too quickly for Norm's satisfaction. "Hey, Tom," Norm asks as he writes up a receipt, "could you maybe ask Bob about that guitar I lent him for that photo shoot? He still hasn't returned it." Petty answers, "He must've forgot about it. Don't worry, he'll bring it back."
"I know he's good for it, but it's been almost six months," Norm says. Bob is Bob Dylan.
They're younger than the Rat Pack and older than the Brat Pack. They're the Wilbury Doughboys, soft and rich, and their membership includes Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, the late Roy Orbison (collectively the Traveling Wilburys), and also Mike Campbell (Heartbreakers), Dave Stewart (Eurythmics), Randy Newman, T-Bone Burnett and Roger McGuinn. They're the Rolling Thunder of San Fernando Valley; working together, writing together, playing together in a small chunk of high-priced California real estate, and selling millions and millions of records together.
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 09:41 PM   #7
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Part 2

Quote:
TOM PETTY: It was Thanksgiving Day, 1987, when the seeds of Full Moon Fever and the Wilburys were planted. I wanted to play baseball real bad that day, but I didn't have a mitt so I drove to the Thrifty Drug store because that was the only place open that I thought might have mitts. I was at the red light just before the Thrifty and I looked over and saw Jeff (Lynne). I had just met him a few weeks earlier in London and I waved for him to pull over. It turned out that he was living not far up the road from me so we exchanged numbers. He was working on the Brian Wilson record at the time so I didn't hear from him for about a month and then he started coming over. The first day I played a song for him that I had written called "Yer So Bad." He said he liked it, but how about if I tried a B minor here, and it instantly improved the song. We finished that song the first day and the next day we wrote "Free Falling." Most of the Heartbreakers were spread all over the country at the time so I grabbed Phil Jones, who plays percussion on some of the Heartbreakers records, and me, him and Jeff went to Campbell's garage studio and made demos of these new songs. When I heard them, I thought, "Hey, these sound like a record." Hmmm. Why not release them as a solo album? And that was that.

So you're happy with the way Full Moon Fever turned out?
I dig this record so much that it's hard for me to talk about it because I'll sound so gushing and immodest. With the exception of Let Me Up, it seems we've tried too hard to make albums. Southern Accents and Long After Dark were very difficult projects, and though I like them, I think they're pretty uneven records. Southern Accents has some good songs on it, like "Don't Come Around Here No More" is probably the best thing we've ever done, but as a complete album it's not quite there. Full Moon Fever starts here, goes to there, ends here and that makes a satisfying record.

You kept the lineup pretty simple. There aren't many guest stars.
I didn't want to call all my friends and have a list of famous names. I just wanted a nice little group. I did get George Harrison to play on one song and Roy (Orbison) does some background vocals on "Zombie Zoo."

What was Roy Orbison like?
[long pause] Roy was such a gentle man and a gentleman. He's one of the greatest people I've ever met. He was very bright, very well read, not some cracker. You wouldn't expect it, but Roy knew all of Monty Python by heart. He loved really offbeat comedy and he had a pretty keen sense of humor himself.

Was he into being a Wilbury?
Oh yeah. Very much so. In his last call to me, a few days before his death, the Wilburys had just gone platinum and he was so thrilled. He kept saying, "Ain't life grand?" He was really rebuilding his confidence.

I can't imagine Roy Orbison having confidence problems.
Well, he knew he was the best singer alive, but he hadn't had a big hit record in a long time. God, he could sing! When he'd sing during the Wilbury sessions we'd all just look at each other with big eyes. Even if he was just sitting at a table working out a song and singing, we'd go, "Roy, quit it, you're driving me crazy." He told us that he really felt invincible because he had the support of all these people, the way everyone loved him so much. When he started recording Mystery Girl he was letting Campbell and T-Bone run everything, but by the time they finished there was a huge change in Roy. He started coming in and really taking charge of the sessions and we were really pleased to see him get his confidence back. I wish he could've seen the success of that album, because if there ever was a guy who was going to dig it.... You know, when someone dies you always hear nice things about them, but Roy really was that way, a very special person.

His album went #1, didn't it?
Yeah, it knocked the Wilburys down to #2.

As a 7-year-old, Tom Petty was sitting in the front yard of his family's townie simplex one day in Gainesville, when his aunt came by and told him that her new husband was working on the set of an Elvis Presley movie, "Follow That Dream," 30 miles away, and did he want to go?
"I knew Elvis Presley was some sort of rock 'n' roll singer -- I remember all the ruckus that was going on in our living room when he was on Ed Sullivan a few years earlier, but I wasn't too familiar with his music," Petty recalls. There wasn't anything else going that day/that week/that month, so Tommy went with his aunt to watch Elvis get out of a car and go into a bank for six hours. "It was an unbelievable scene at the filming. There must've been a thousand screaming girls on the other side of a chain link fence. After what seemed like an eternity, Elvis got out of a long white Cadillac and walked across the street. It was the most fucking awesome thing I've ever seen. Elvis didn't look like the people I'd known. He had a real glow around him, like a full-body halo. He looked like a god to me. When that day's filming was over he came over and shok my hand and a bunch of other kids' hands. I'll never forget that."
From that day in 1961 Tom Petty has done little else except follow the rock'n'roll dream. Bruce Springsteen once said that if you saw Elvis Presley and didn't want to be like him there was something wrong with you. There was nothing wrong with Tom Petty that a box full of Presley singles couldn't cure. "After I saw Elvis that one time, I became obsessed. A friend of mine had a bunch of records that his sister had left behind when she married and moved away. I traded him a Wham-O slingshot for them, which was quite a big deal in those days, but there were about 30 Elvis records, plus stuff by Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis. For the next two years all I did was sit in my room and listen to those records. My dad was worried about me because I didn't go outside, I didn't play sports, I didn't do nothing but listen to those records.
"I can't tell you how much rock'n'roll consumed me. It wasn't a matter of choice. It was something that came over me like a disease. It was all I lived for and it's only been lately, like the last three or four years, that I realized that there is more to life than rock'n'roll."
Tom Petty has six platinum records and two gold ones hanging on his wall in Encino. He and his remarkable Heartbreakers have torn up crowds for 13 years now. They've toured the world with Dylan. Petty has also cowritten huge hits for other performers, including "Stop Draggin' My Heart" with Stevie Nicks, "You Got It" with Roy Orbison, "Ways To Be Wicked" for Lone Justice, and Rosanne Cash's #1 country single, "Never Be You." Through it all, Petty remains, first and foremost, a great rock'n'roll fan. His voice, tiny and expressive, is a fan's voice. Though detractors might call Petty a ripoff, pointing out how the melody of "Breakdown" is a direct lift of the Animals' "Cheating," and how "Listen To Her Heart" and several other Petty "originals" are right out of the Byrds songbook, Petty just shrugs off the derivative tag. "The Byrds are to me what Chuck Berry was to the Stones and what Buddy Holly was to the Beatles," he says. Roger McGuinn of the Byrds covered "American Girl," like a stamp of approval, soon after it was released in '76. He knew early on that there was something exciting and different about this Byrdsphile.

When your first album came out, you were considered punk rock, weren't you?
At first, yeah. We played with a lot of punk bands like the Clash, the Ramones and Blondie, and played at clubs like CBGB's. so we got lumped into that whole punk thing. Then people started saying, "Well they're different, but they're not punk," so they called us new wave. I think we were the first band to be called new wave, not that it's any honor you'd want to hang on your wall.

Did you like playing with punk bands?
Yeah, it was wild; wilder than anything we saw in Gainesville, I'll tell you that. I saw some great bands. Mink DeVille, I thought, was going to be the next Stones. They killed us. We were in London for the first or second time Elvis Costello ever played out in front of an audience. I thought, hmmm, ballsy name, and then he comes out, just him and a guitar, and he was great. Those were wonderful days, though we really took shit from both sides. To the punks we were slow and wimpy and to the mainstream crowd we were too wild and original. Plus, they couldn't understand a band from Florida not playing "Free Bird."

Was there a lot of backstabbing from the scene when you made it big?
Oh, yeah. A lot of people had the attitude in those days that it was wrong to be successful. John Doe [of X] was telling me how fucked it was that some of the LA bands were copping attitudes like they didn't want hits. He said, "I'd love to have a fucking hit!" That's what rock'n'roll is all about. Musicians want to be heard by a lot of people. That's a basic thing. After we got big and famous and everything, we'd go back to the Whiskey and there'd be all these kids in spiky hair giving us shit, and that really hurt. When we started playing the Whiskey there was no scene, but we stuck it out and helped create one.
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 09:42 PM   #8
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Part 3.

Quote:
Though the Heartbreakers weren't considered punk for long, they did maintain some of the spirit, especially in their dealings with MCA, which had bought Shelter and thus them. When radio resisted the single "Listen To Her Heart" because of the drug reference in the line, "You think you're gonna take her away/With your money and your cocaine," Petty refused to change the last word to champagne, even though it meant sacrificing the chance for a hit. Shortly afterward, refusing to be dealt with like a slab of rump roast, Petty and the Heartbreakers took MCA to court for a lengthy and costly battle. The band ended up filing for bankruptcy before settling with MCA, but out of the legal dust rose their best-selling album to date, Damn the Torpeodes, which went on to sell four million copies. Petty tangled with MCA on the band's next release, Hard Promises, as well, The company wanted to raise the price on the record from the norm of $8.98 to $9.98. Petty threatened to title the album $8.98 if MCA didn't withdraw the hike. It stayed at $8.98.
"You know what was the worst thing about the whole Hard Promises ordeal? We spent so much time fighting about the price that we didn't realize it was a real boring album cover," Petty says. "Since then, I've always been real particular about the album covers. I still cringe when I see Hard Promises."

As the black 'Vette turns right down La Something street, Petty says, "You know, Full Moon Fever's a very Los Angeles record." He says it defiantly, proudly. "One of the great things about LA is that you can be all alone in your car -- alone and moving fast. It's very therapeutic."
I almost ask him about the fire, but I can't. On May 17, 1987, at about 10 a.m., Tom Petty was home having breakfast with his wife of 14 years and his youngest daughter when someone set his house on fire. The arsonist was never caught, and the house burned to the ground. The Pettys escape unharmed, though their maid was overcome with smoke inhalation but survived.
Petty spent almost a year after the fire driving all over LA looking for a new house. A new home. He drove through the canyons, down the beaches and up the hills. He had the radio on. Much of Full Moon Fever seems written from behind the wheel of a dream car speeding from a nightmare. It's all alone and moving fast. It's very therapeutic.
Tom Petty drops me off at the hotel and waves back from the red light. When it turns green, the black 'Vette makes a mighty roar and takes off.
I typed this all up myself.

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Old Oct 21, 2010, 11:35 PM   #9
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This is fantastic to read.

You are nuts to type this all out Aimee but I am so glad you did
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Old Oct 22, 2010, 06:21 AM   #10
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I actally typed 50-some articles. This is one of the shorter ones (only 4 pages of text and a good portion is taken up by pictures and ads)

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Old Oct 22, 2010, 03:30 PM   #11
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OK so I finished typing the one in the opening post. :)

Quote:
A Good Time Was Had By All
By Elizabeth Wurtzel
New York Magazine -- December 3, 1990


Even rock stars meed a break sometimes. And indeed, more and more albums seem to be the rock-and-roll equivalents of bowling night. Two years ago, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan, Jeff Lynne, and George Harrison were just goofing around in the studio together when -- presto! -- there appeared the Traveling Wilburys' first album, one of 1988's most critically acclaimed hits.
Since then, Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits has used his vacation time to gather Brendan Croker and some other less-renowned friends to form the Notting Hillbillies. The band's 1989 debut album had the lazy, laid-back, guys-just-hanging-out title Missing ... Presumed Having a Good Time. And now Warren Zevon and some other members of R.E.M. have gotten together as the Hindu Love Gods -- yet another case of the boys just being boys and having a good time.
Despite Roy Orbison's death, in December 1988, the Traveling Wilburys have returned -- even though the group was most likely conceived as a one-shot deal, not a multi-album one. Titled Volume 3 (Wilbury/Warner Bros.), this second record is deliberately misnamed, probably because the Wilburys are just being weird. After all, the members identify themselves only as brothers with the surname Wilbury, claiming in the liner notes to be descendants of some lost tribe of Neanderthals who somehow landed in a recording studio in Los Angeles. But the real joke was on the critics who fell in love with Volume 1, an album that was supposed to free these artists from the constraints of doing the serious work that pleases the music press.
But the Traveling Wilburys needn't worry about that kind of reception this time, because Volume 3 simply does not match Volume 1. Then again, how could it? The debut album was loaded with upbeat, irresistible songs like "Handle With Care" that unified the rock audience. Volume 1 presented these aging rock stars to the teenybopper contingent as a new act, while, for obvious reasons, the Traveling Wilburys appealed to the baby-boomers on the other end of the market spectrum.
Volume 3 is a fine album, also full of catchy, bait-heavy hooks that are bound to make a big hit, but something is missing. Obviously, that "something" is Orbison. But it's hard to believe he had that much of an impact on the Wilburys' sound, since by the time he joined the group, he had been more or less out of the studio for twenty years and could hardly have had as much sway as a producer like Lynne or the other, more active musicians onboard. Certainly, though, the lack of Orbison's voice -- the voice that Bruce Springsteen said he'd most like to emulate when he inducted his hero into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the voice that carried the desperate sorrow of "Only the Lonely" and naughty flirtation of "Oh, Pretty Woman" -- is a loss for the Traveling Wilburys. Volume 3 sounds very much like its predecessor, but it's not as good.
The Wilburys deserve praise for delivering songs about the environment ("Inside Out") and other issues with a fun, doo-wop tone that is never preachy but also never downplays the seriousness of the subject matter. This has been the strength of the Traveling Wilburys all along. Somehow, the combination of talent has allowed them to come up with songs that can be heartbreaking and frightening. But in the spirit of old-fashioned, early-sixties rock and roll, these tunes can also dance in the face of adversity. "You took my breath away," Tom Petty sings mournfully, and then, giving the cliche an ironic twist, he adds, "I want it back again."
One of the best things about the Traveling Wilburys' projects is that they provide Dylan with a band he can get lost in, one that enables him to forget for a while that he's Bob Dylan. He sounds as if he is having fun on both volumes, something that is not reflected on this year's Under a Red Sky, which mostly showed him straining to recapture past glory.
Dylan and Petty do most of the lead vocal work on Volume 3, and one song that Dylan songs, "If You Belonged To Me," resembles some of the brief, tender, harmonica-drenched love ballads that he used to write, full of characters and sly observations ("You say let's go to the rodeo and see some cowboy fall/Sometimes it seems to me that you've got no sympathy at all/You keep on going on and on about how you're so free/You'd be happy as you could be/If you belonged to me")
For years, Neil Young made whatever strange -- and frankly, awful -- albums he wanted to with no regard for his audience or the critics, and now everyone loves his new album; some people think it's his best ever. Maybe Dylan needs to spend a few years having a good time with the Wilburys, recording what he feels like recording when he feels like it. The fun he's having may just stay with him one day.
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Old Oct 23, 2010, 02:48 AM   #12
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Aimee spare yourself all that work for here at Links because this was all in the link you added.
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Old Oct 23, 2010, 06:35 AM   #13
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Actually its not that much trouble.
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Old Oct 23, 2010, 03:43 PM   #14
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Heres another one i typed today between sorting out my Petty concerts. Notice the prediction at the end (The Wilburys will not continue their musical greatness)

Quote:
A Real 'Supergroup'
The Traveling Wilburys
by Robb Frederick
Collegian -- January 25, 1989


Throughout the history of rock music, several attempts have been made to create the ideal 'supergroup,' but few efforts have resulted in a band deserving of the label.
The formation of Blind Faith, a powerhouse group containing Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood, gave music fans of the '60s a brief view of a 'supergroup,' but personality conflicts ended the band's short reign.
Another attempt was made during 1985, when Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page joined Paul Rodgers, the vocalist for Bad Company, and two studio musicians gathered to create The Firm. Although The Firm offered stimulating collaborations, the group was not well received by the public, and disbanded after two albums.
The latest attempt of 'supergroup' formation, The Traveling Wilburys, offers a combined effort by five prominent musical pioneers. Success at last.
But who are these mystical Wilburys? According to the album's liner notes, the Wilburys are five brothers who shared the same father although each had a different mother. Each artist has also selected a light-hearted pseudonym for the Wilbury's first release, Volume One.
The unorthodox lineup of five rhythm guitarists includes Lucky Wilbury (Bob Dylan), Otis Wilbury (Jeff Lynne), Nelson Wilbury (George Harrison), Lefty Wilbury (Roy Orbison), and Charlie T. Jr. (Tom Petty).
The concept of the Wilburys was initially devised to supply the B-Side for a single to be released by George Harrison. The worthiness of the resulting song was instantly recognized by executives at Warner Bros., and the group was asked to continue recording.
In spite of the differing styles that these superior musicians are known for, the group's collaborations are excellent. The Wilburys combine their talents for the upbeat "End of the Line," which finishes the album with a grateful, worry-free message, and the catchy "Margarita," which is perhaps Volume One's most exhilarating offering. On the opening number, "Handle With Care," each of the Wilburys takes a turn at complementing George Harrison's lead vocals.
Although the combined efforts of the Wilburys are enough to please most listeners, the remainder of this album consists of small collaborations or solo efforts that illustrate the true potential of these artists.
Following the considerable success of his comeback album Cloud Nine, Harrison remains in fine form throughout Volume One. His lead vocals on "Handle With Care" and "Heading for the Light" are a welcome return for an artist who has remained silent for too long.
Tom Petty validates his position in the Wilburys line-up on "Last Night," a song describing the unpleasant ending of a one-night stand.
Jeff Lynne of the Electric Light Orchestra is virtually an unknown when compared to the other Wilburys. Although his musical input is usually given as a producer, Lynne is an extremely talented musician who proves his significance on the song "Rattled."
Bob Dylan, who was once considered "the spokesman of a generation," supplies the greatest performance on Volume One. Dylan's recent solo works have suffered from a lack of energy and worthwhile material, but he returns to peak form on songs like "Congratulations," "Dirty World," and "Tweeter and the Monkey Man."
The only upsetting aspect of the Traveling Wilburys has been the untimely death of rock legend Roy Orbison, the group's fifth member. Through his inclusion in the Wilburys and the completion of a forthcoming solo album, Orbison's career was coming back in full force. His death in early December not only destroyed the chances of a continuation of the Wlburys, it ended a long career of extraordinary musical accomplishments.
Orbison can be remembered on his Wilbury ballad "Not Alone Anymore," which demonstrates the classic Orbison - a love song in which notes are reached with an ease rivaled by no others.
Although the Traveling Wilburys will not continue their musical greatness, their efforts will be remembered and respected by many. The music world has finally found its supergroup.

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Old Oct 27, 2010, 06:47 PM   #15
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Throwing a few more articles out here.

A few mistakes in this one. Its a bit amusing:
Quote:
Traveling Wilburys are coming
By Steve Morse
The Day -- September 8, 1988


If you haven't heard about the Traveling Wilburys, you will in the coming weeks. They're a star-laden pickup band featuring Roy Orbison, Bob Dylan, George Harrison, and Tom petty. They've made an album due in mid-October, using such names as Lefty Wilbury (Orbison) and his brothers Otis (Harrison), Lucky (Dylan) and Charlie T. Jr. (Petty).
"I guess you could call it inverted cool," laughs Orbison, chatting on the phone from Los Angeles this week. "We wanted a lighthearted name as opposed to anything serious. We were thinking of the Beatles in 'A Hard Day's Night.' Something along those lines."
The Wilburys arose spontaneously. Orbison was making a solo album with producer Jeff Lynn, who was also finishing a Petty album. Lynn then hit on the idea of calling Harrison in England. Harrison came over and said, "Let's go to Bob's house." Off they went, enlisted Dylan, then all ended up at the home of Dave Stewart (of Eurythmics), writing songs in Stewart's living room.
"We wrote together, though Dylan raced ahead of us. You have to jump to keep up with him because he's so fast. he still has the knack," says Orbison.
"We each have one song we sing mostly solo, then on the other tunes we share verses," adds Orbison. "My wife says it's a man's album. She says it's a bunch of men getting together and talking about women. I guess she's right."
The Traveling Wilburys will also make a film in late September. Meanwhile, Orbison is finishing a solo album, now pushed back to a January release. It won't include a Bruce Springsteen tune as expected.
Heres a second one.
Quote:
Legends joined to become 'Traveling Wilburys'
By David Bauder
The Fort Scott Tribune -- December 14, 1988


ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) -- The true legend of the Traveling Wilburys became when George Har..., er, Nelson Wilbury needed to record an extra song at short notice and invited two of his dinner companions to lend their voices.
Nine days and 10 songs later, the result was one of those happy accidents that proves there's more to the music business than accountants and estates.
You won't find the names George Harrison, Bob Dylan, the late Roy Orbison, Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne on "Volume One," the debut album by the oddly-named Traveling Wilburys. But the dark glasses and pseudonyms can't hide those familiar talents.
"We definitely didn't want to treat this like a supergroup," said Petty, or Charles T. Wilbury Jr.
Harrison mentioned to Lynne and Orbison, who died of a heart attack on Dec. 7, that he needed a new B-side for a 12-inch single release. The other two said they'd help him put together a song.
The former Beatle had to retrieve his guitar, which he'd left at Petty's California house during a visit a few days earlier, Petty said. The lead Heartbreaker was also asked to join in on the record.
Since all the nearby studios were booked, the three amigos had to impose on another friend who had recording facilities in his house. Dylan said he'd be glad to offer his assistance.
"We all sat around the grass at Bob's house and wrote this song called 'Handle With Care' and recorded it that night," Petty recalled. "When it was all done it sounded really good."
Much too good, they thought, for a B-side. So they kept on writing and recording.
"It was a very innocent thing, really," Petty said. "We were just kind of enjoying it and we were deep into it before we realized almost what we were doing."
That spontaneity, and a lot of humor, comes through on the record. "Volume One" sounds like a group of friends, albeit extremely talented friends, enjoying themselves together. All five trade lead and backing vocals and strum guitars.
The results are a cross between Harrison's early '70s solo work and the electronic flourishes Lynne brought to the Electric Light Orchestra. Orbison's "Not Alone Any More" is in the vein he had mined for a quarter-century and the three songs Dylan dominates are some of his best work in years.
The song "Dirty World" pokes fun at Prince with a series of sexual double-entendres and the wickedly funny "Tweeter and the Monkey Man" is littered with Bruce Springsteen references.
Credit a non-rocker, Prince Charles of Britain, with the name Traveling Wilburys, Petty said.
Harrison and Lynne performed at the Prince's Trust concert last year and were complimented by the host following the show, he said. The prince said the two should form a band, and when they asked for a name, he suggested th Traveling Wilburys, Petty said.
The quintet quickly adopted the persona. Harrison is identified throughout as Nelson Wilbury, Lynne as Otis Wilbury, Orbison was Lefty Wilbury and Dylan's called Lucky.
The whimsical liner notes explain that "the original Wilburys were a stationary people who, realizing that their civilization could not stand still forever, began to go for short walks."
The offbeat sense of humor seemed to take the pressure off the participants and lent the album a certain mystique, said Paul Grein, author of the Chartbeat column in Billboard magazine. It's working -- the album debuted on the charts at No. 57 and shot to No. 23 in its second week, he said.
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Old Oct 27, 2010, 09:29 PM   #16
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Thanks again Aimee.

Funny to see how the three articles have different interpretations of the start of the Wilbury gang.

Lynne then hit on the idea of calling Harrison in England. Harrison came over
He was already there?


Harrison mentioned to Lynne and Orbison, who died of a heart attack on Dec. 7, that he needed a new B-side for a 12-inch single release. The other two said they'd help him put together a song.
The former Beatle had to retrieve his guitar, which he'd left at Petty's California house during a visit a few days earlier, Petty said.


Much too good, they thought, for a B-side. So they kept on writing and recording.

They continued after Warner's request?

Credit a non-rocker, Prince Charles of Britain, with the name Traveling Wilburys, Petty said.
Harrison and Lynne performed at the Prince's Trust concert last year and were complimented by the host following the show, he said. The prince said the two should form a band, and when they asked for a name, he suggested th Traveling Wilburys, Petty said.


Wilbury humor?

The concept of the Wilburys was initially devised to supply the B-Side for a single to be released by George Harrison. The worthiness of the resulting song was instantly recognized by executives at Warner Bros., and the group was asked to continue recording.

The real story?
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Old Oct 28, 2010, 03:59 AM   #17
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Oh, theres really a lot of mistakes in articles like these.. Always take them with a grain of salt and cross-check them with other sources...
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Old Oct 28, 2010, 11:37 AM   #18
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I just read between the interesting lines
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Old Oct 28, 2010, 11:43 AM   #19
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Yeah, if you go to Google News Archive and type in Traveling Wilburys theres a lot of interesting stuff. Some of it costs but in the advanced settings you can make it just show free stuff.
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Old Oct 28, 2010, 01:31 PM   #20
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This is part of a Rolling Stone article. August 8, 1991.
Quote:
Petty credits his Traveling Wilburys experience with getting him back in touch with the pure joy of making music. "After a lot of years and a lot of booze,'' he says, "I came to the conclusion that all I can do is try to amuse myself, really.'' And that, according to Petty, was the magic of the Wilburys. "To be honest, we didn't give a shit how we were perceived by other people,'' he says. "That was nothing more than a bunch of guys making an honest attempt at having fun. Rock got so over-intellectualized for a while. The Wilburys just refused to take themselves seriously.'' Petty cites this -- and George Harrison's and Jeff Lynne's utter disinterest in touring -- as the reason the group never hit the road.

"We might have destroyed the spirit of the thing,'' Petty says. It was a spirit, he adds, that was hard enough to hold on to after the death of Roy Orbison. Eventually, around the time of the second Wilburys album, there was a meeting to discuss the possibility of a tour. "A lot of money was offered to us, but at the end of the meeting, we'd decided not to do it,'' Petty says. "And I kept getting down on my knees in front of George, saying, 'Please! It's so much money.' And everybody would just start laughing. It was that kind of meeting; we'd look at each other and start giggling nervously, going, 'Nah, we can't.' Like George says, I can't see waking up in a hotel in Philadelphia and having to do a Wilburys sound check.''

The fact that the second Wilburys album, Vol. 3, didn't sell as well as the first didn't dampen his view of the experience. "See, I'm not exactly a guy who makes new friends easily,'' Petty says. "And here I was making all these great new pals. And we were making this music -- and the fact that there were some people who liked it just made it all the better.'' Petty's affection for his Wilbury brothers is apparently mutual. "Tom's finally getting some recognition,'' says Bob Dylan. "That's good. Tom's an excellent songwriter, an excellent musician. People talk about how he sounds a little like Roger McGuinn, but playing with him and seeing what he does to a crowd, I think he's more in the Bob Marley area. He's real good.''
An article published in Musician in April 1990:
Quote:
The original plan was for the [Heartbreakers] to record a new album from late '89 to early '90, leaving Tom the spring of '90 to work on a second Wilburys project. But no one expected Full Moon Fever to be such a smash. Now the Heartbreakers want to keep working, but Tom sees no reason to push it. Things are great-- why get nervous? The underlying fear among the Heartbreakers is that if they quit touring now, Tom will get caught up with the Wilburys again, which will lead God-knows-where for God-knows-how-long, and another year will be lost.
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