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Old Nov 15, 2005, 01:42 AM   #1
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Default Lennon's school drawings set to fetch up to 90,000

Lennon's school drawings set to fetch up to 90,000

Nov 15 2005

John Vincent reports on a teacher's family ready to sell early work by one of his most famous pupils

Daily Post

http://icliverpool.icnetwork.co.uk/0...name_page.html


John Lennon's execise book, showing the Walrus and the Carpenter poem.

JOHN LENNON may have left school without a single O-Level - but his drawings left a lasting impression on English teacher and housemaster Lancelot Burrows.

He kept 12-year-old Lennon's exercise book to show future generations of pupils at Liverpool's Quarry Bank High School.

Now the family of the late Mr Burrows is to cash in on the world's most expensive schoolbook - by selling it at a manuscripts auction next month.

The book in which Lennon poured out his artistic talent - and laid the foundations for one of the Beatles's most famous hits - is set to fetch up to 90,000 at Sotheby's in London on December 15.


The book, compiled by Lennon in his first year at Quarry Bank in 1952, and covered in a protective layer of brown paper, contains eight drawings in pen, pencil and watercolour illustrating verses from classic poems, copied out by Lennon.


One of the poems was Lewis Carroll's The Walrus and the Carpenter - later acknowledged by Lennon as being the inspiration for the famously unfathomable Beatles song I am the Walrus.


It is perhaps a coincidence that the oysters in Lennon's drawing - which accompanied by two verses from Carroll's poem in Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There - look remarkably like "eggmen".


Other illustrations depict scenes from classic poems by Robert Southey, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, William Cowper, Alfred Lord Tennyson and Michael Drayton, as well as one from Robin Hood.


The cover is marked, somewhat precociously for a 12-year-old, "My Anthology", and each drawing is marked out of ten in red by Lennon's teacher - the lowest being eight ("good").

After leaving Dovedale primary Lennon went to Quarry Bank, a suburban grammar school in Allerton close to his Aunt Mimi's house, with his best friend Pete Shotton in 1952.

Although Lennon was intelligent, his work got steadily worse and after failing all his O-Levels he went to Liverpool College of Art. It was at Quarry Bank that Lennon, then a "teddy boy", formed his first group, The Quarrymen, with schoolfriends Pete Shotton, Eric Griffiths, Len Garry, Colin Hanton and a lad called Rod. Later the group became Johnny and the Moondogs, the Silver Beatles and, finally, the Beatles.

English literature specialist Tessa Milne of Sotheby's said: "Mr Burrows was a key influence on the young John Lennon and encouraged him to pursue his artistic and literary interests. These drawings are remarkably accomplished for one so young, and the book is a wonderful example of Lennon's emerging artistic talent.

"They are proof the skills of the rebellious schoolboy were not lost on Mr Burrows, who encouraged his interest in poetry and art and then kept this exemplary exercise book from 1952 for the benefit of future generations of pupils at Quarry Bank."

The drawings in the book foreshadow the artwork Lennon produced as a teenager for The Daily Howl, a mock newspaper full of caricatures and satirical verses which he circulated among his classmates at Quarry Bank, themselves precursors of his later humorous poetry and prose, such as In His Own Write (1964) and A Spaniard in the Works (1965).

Lennon himself did not take the words to I Am the Walrus too seriously. He said in 1973: "I was the Walrus, whatever that means ... everybody presumes that just because I said I was the Walrus that it must mean I am God or something, but it's just poetry. But it became symbolic of me..."

Brian Davies, head of Calder-stones School, which used to be Quarry Bank, said: "It's a strange thing to do, keep a book by a 12-year-old. Maybe he had taken them home to mark and had forgotten them.


"Unless you had a time machine, how would anyone know which of the children they taught would be millionaires?"
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Old Nov 16, 2005, 03:32 PM   #2
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That is just really great. I don't know what's up with Mr. Burrows. Maybe he just kept all the ones he thought were really good, and lo and behold, John ends up being one of the most famous people on Earth.

I wish someone would publish his "Anthology" in book form; I'd love to see the rest of his illustrations and the poetry he picked out.
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Old Dec 15, 2005, 07:03 PM   #3
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containing eight drawings executed by Lennon in pen, pencil and watercolour, each one illustrating a verse from a classic poem written out by Lennon in ink, the eight titles being: "The Inchcape Rock" [by Robert Southey] ("They hear no sound, the swell is strong..."), "The Fasting of Hiawatha" [by Longfellow] ("And he saw a youth approaching..."), "the walrus and the carpenter" [by Lewis Carroll] ("It was so kind of you to come!..."), "Robin Hood" ("As Robin Hood in the forest stood..."), "O Little Town of Bethlehem", "Morte D'Arthur" [by Tennyson] ("But ere he dipt the surface..."), "John Gilpin" [by William Cowper] ("John Gilpin, at his horse's side..."), and "Agincourt" [by Michael Drayton] ("When down their bows they threw..."), each drawing marked by Lennon's teacher in red ink, the lowest mark being an 8 ("good"); together with a pencil and ink drawing by Lennon at the end entitled "Badgers Green - the Docter"


PROVENANCE

John Lennon's English teacher and housemaster at the Quarry Bank School, thence by descent


LITERATURE AND REFERENCES


Ray Coleman, Lennon: the Definitive Biography, 1995; Richard Middleton, Oxford DNB, 2004; Peter Doggett, The Art & Music of John Lennon, 2005, pp.8-10



CATALOGUE NOTE

10 illustrated pages (plus blanks), 4to, in an exercise book bound in red paper wrappers covered in brown paper, the upper wrapper inscribed by Lennon "My Anthology" within a mock coat-of-arms and signed by him at the top [half of signature torn away], the covering also inscribed by Lennon "My | Anthology | John Lennon | 1R | Bailey House", [1952], slight offsetting from the illustrations, small portion of upper wrapper torn away with loss of half of Lennon's signature, two ink-stains to paper cover, cover slightly creased and nicked


remarkable and vibrant example of the emerging artistic talent of the young john lennon.

The present drawings, executed by the twelve-year-old Lennon in 1952, are proof that the talents of the famously rebellious schoolboy were not lost on his English teacher and housemaster Lancelot Burrows, who encouraged his interest in poetry and art, and kept this exemplary exercise book from 1952 for the benefit of future generations of pupils at the Quarry Bank School. Not surprisingly, following dire results in the general certificate of education exams, Lennon's further education took the form of an art course at the Liverpool College of Art (1957-60).

The drawings in this exercise book foreshadow the artwork Lennon produced as a teenager for The Daily Howl, a mock newspaper full of caricatures and satirical verses which he circulated among his classmates at the Quarry Bank School. His teenage artwork, often mixing whimsical and surreal drawings with ingenuous word-play, can itself be seen as a precursor to his later works of humourous poetry and prose, In His Own Write (1964) and A Spaniard in the Works (1965).

Of particular interest, with regard to the lyrics of Lennon's later songs, (always such a rich source of conjecture for Beatlemaniacs) is his illustration of a verse from Lewis Carroll's 'The Walrus and the Carpenter', acknowledged by lennon as being the inspiration for his famously surreal song "i am the walrus", first recorded in 1967 (it is a charming coincidence that the oysters in Lennon's drawing look remarkably like "eggmen" -- see illustration above). The walrus, here depicted elegantly perched on a "conveniently low" rock, was to feature twice more in Lennon's songs; in "Glass Onion", The Beatles, or "The White Album", 1968 ("...I told you about the walrus and me, man. | You know that we're as close as can be - man. | Well here's another clue for you all | The walrus was Paul...") and in "God", John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band, 1970 ("...The dream is over | Yesterday | I was the Dreamweaver | But now I'm reborn | I was the Walrus | But now I'm John | And so dear friends | You'll just have to carry on | The dream is over").

...I was the Walrus, whatever that means...the Walrus was a big capitalist that ate all the fuckin' oysters...I always had this image of the Walrus in the garden and I loved it, and so I didn't ever check what the Walrus was...But he's a fucking bastard, that's what he turns out to be. But...everybody presumes...just 'cause I said I am the Walrus that it must mean I am God or something, but it's just poetry. But it became symbolic of me... (Lennon Remembers: the Rolling Stone Interviews, ed. J. Wenner, 1973).

included in this lot is a class photograph of Form 1R at Quarry Bank School, September 1952, depicting John Lennon in the back row (second from left) and Lancelot Burrows as the housemaster.
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Last edited by I am the Paulrus : Dec 16, 2005 at 01:18 AM.
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Old Apr 18, 2006, 12:46 PM   #4
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http://www.cooperowen.com/asp/fullCa...8565&saletype=



John Lennon, original school exercise book titled 'Anthology', containing personally illustrated hand written poems, 1952
Ten illustrated pages (plus blanks), in an exercise book bound in red paper, covered in brown paper. The upper wrapper inscribed "My Anthology" by Lennon within a mock coat-of-arms and signed by him at the top [half of signature torn away]. The covering also inscribed "My Anthology John Lennon 1R Bailey House", [1952], by Lennon.

A remarkable and vibrant example of the emerging artistic talent of the young (12 year old) John Lennon. Containing ten drawings executed by Lennon in pen, pencil and watercolour as part of his English Literature curriculum.

Each drawing illustrates a verse from a classic English poem which has been transcribed by Lennon, in blue ink.
The eight titles being:
"The Inchcape Rock" [by Robert Southey] ("They hear no sound, the swell is strong..."),
"The Fasting of Hiawatha" [by Longfellow] ("And he saw a youth approaching..."),
"The walrus and the carpenter" [by Lewis Carroll] ("It was so kind of you to come!..."),
"Robin Hood" ("As Robin Hood in the forest stood..."),
"O Little Town of Bethlehem",
"Morte D'Arthur" [by Tennyson] ("But ere he dipt the surface..."),
"John Gilpin" [by William Cowper] ("John Gilpin, at his horse's side..."), and
"Agincourt" [by Michael Drayton] ("When down their bows they threw...").

Each drawing has been marked by Lennon's teacher [Lancelot Burrows] in red ink, the lowest mark being a '8' ("good"), the highest being a '9' ("very good").

An additional later page has a neat pencil and ink drawing by Lennon which he's titled "Badgers Green - the Docter" in his hand. This particular drawing is executed in a much more mature and stylistic manner, and therefore can be presumed to be from a later date.

The drawings in this exercise book foreshadow the artwork Lennon produced as a teenager for The Daily Howl, a mock newspaper full of drawings, news stories, weather reports and commentaries which he circulated among his class-mates at the Quarry Bank School. His teenage artwork, often mixing whimsical and surreal drawings with ingenuous word-play, can itself be seen as a precursor to his later works of humorous poetry and prose, In His Own Write (1964) and A Spaniard in the Works (1965). His Aunt Mimi told Lennon biographer Ray Coleman, when reflecting on his childhood, "His mind was going the whole time; it was either drawing, or writing poetry, or reading. He was a great reader. It was books, books, books ..." It is known that two of Lennon's favourite books 'Alice In Wonderland' and 'Alice Through The looking Glass' were given to him as a present when he was a young boy, and these copies were found at Aunt Mimi's home after she passed away.

The drawings, executed by the twelve-year-old Lennon, are proof that the talents of the famously rebellious schoolboy were not lost on his English teacher and housemaster Lancelot Burrows, who encouraged his interest in poetry and art, and kept this exemplary exercise book dated 1952 for the benefit of future generations of pupils at the Quarry Bank School. Burrows is remembered as an inspirational English teacher and housemaster. He had the rare ability to manage boys in his pastoral role and to inspire all his pupils as their English teacher and the producer of many school plays." Not surprisingly, following dire results in the general certificate of education exams, Lennon's further education took the form of an art course at the Liverpool College of Art (1957-60), after help and guidance from the influential headmaster, William Ernest Pobjoy, who arranged for John to enter the college without having to take an examination.

It is known that Lennon was very proud and had fond memories of the artwork he produced from this period of his life, to the extent that he chose several pieces, of which he had kept, to be used for the cover art work for his 1974 album 'Walls and Bridges', most notably the pieces titled Football and Indians

Of particular interest, with regard to the lyrics of Lennon's later songs, (always such a rich source of conjecture for Beatlemaniacs) is his illustration of a verse from Lewis Carroll's 'The Walrus and the Carpenter', acknowledged by Lennon as being the inspiration for his famously surreal song "I Am The Walrus" from the Magical Mystery Tour, recorded in 1967 (it is a charming coincidence that the oysters in Lennon's drawing look remarkably like "eggmen"). The drawing is obviously influenced by the 'official' illustrations by Sir John Tenniel (Wood-engraving by the Dalziels), specifically Chapter Four of the 1871 publication of 'Alice Through The Looking Glass', from which this particular verse is taken. The walrus, here depicted elegantly perched on a "conveniently low" rock, was to feature twice more in Lennon's songs; in "Glass Onion", from "The White Album", 1968 ("...I told you about the walrus and me, man. | You know that we're as close as can be - man. | Well here's another clue for you all | The walrus was Paul...") and in "God", John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band, 1970 ("...The dream is over | Yesterday | I was the Dreamweaver | But now I'm reborn | I was the Walrus | But now I'm John | And so dear friends | You'll just have to carry on | The dream is over").

Lennon was to reflect when interviewed for The Rolling Stone magazine in the early 70's ...I was the Walrus, whatever that means... the Walrus was a big capitalist that ate all the fuckin' oysters... I always had this image of the Walrus in the garden and I loved it, and so I didn't ever check what the Walrus was... But he's a fucking bastard, that's what he turns out to be. But... Everybody presumes... just 'cause I said I am the Walrus that it must mean I am God or something, but it's just poetry. But it became symbolic of me...

Included in this lot is a class photograph of Form 1R, Quarry Bank School, September 1952, depicting John Lennon in the back row (second from left) and Lancelot Burrows as the housemaster.

It's getting better all the time I used to get mad at my school. The teachers who taught me weren't cool. Holding me down, turning me round. Filling me up with your rules... (from "Getting Better", by Lennon & McCartney, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)
Slight off-setting from the illustrations, small portion of upper wrapper torn away with loss of half of Lennon's signature, two ink-stains to paper cover, cover slightly creased and nicked.

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES:
Ray Coleman, Lennon: the Definitive Biography, 1995
Jann Wenner, Lennon Remembers: The Rolling Stone Interviews, 1973
Peter Doggett, The Art & Music of John Lennon, 2005, pp.8-10
James Henke, Lennon Legend, 2003, pp.6-8.
PROVENANCE: John Lennon's English teacher and housemaster at the Quarry Bank School, thence by descent
Estimate 100,000-150,000

http://www.cooperowen.com/asp/fullCa...8510&saletype=



John Lennon, engraved silver Christening Bracelet, 1940
The sterling silver bracelet with rolled edges and a cross-hatch design within which surrounds a panel reading John. Further engraving within the band reads 9th Oct. '40, Lennon's birth date.
One would, most assuredly, be hard-pressed to locate an earlier artefact related to John Lennon than this engraved sterling silver baptismal bracelet. The bracelet was obtained directly from the estate of John's "Aunt Mimi" (Mary Elizabeth Smith), after her death in 1991.
As one of four sister's of John's mother, Julia Lennon, Aunt Mimi insisted that John move in with her after Julia took a live-in boyfriend when John was five. John's father, Freddie, went to sea as a ship's steward shortly after John's birth, and remained at sea throughout World War II. John still saw his mother frequently, and though she had a profound effect on him well beyond her premature death in 1958 resulting from being hit by a car, Aunt Mimi exerted considerably more influence on him through his teen years. It was Mimi who bought John his first guitar, even though she cautioned him The guitar's alright as a hobby, but you'll never make a living out of it. She also agreed to give John the opportunity to study at the Liverpool College of Art after a dismal academic tenure at Quarry Bank High School.
Accompanied by a typed letter mentioning the bracelet as well as several other items found in the attic of Mimi's home and given to her friend, Alice Williams. A truly special artifact related to an iconic figure of the 20th century.
The child's bracelet measures approx. 1 3/4" wide and 5/8" thick (4 x 2 cm)
Estimate 25,000-35,000
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Old Apr 18, 2006, 01:07 PM   #5
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Wow! This stuff is awesome! Could you imagine owning that exercise book? Where are those millions I wish I had????

I have to say, the little christening bracelet just "got" me...aww, it's so CUTE! Can't you just picture it on baby John's chubby little wrist? Yep, I admit it, I got all ferklempt...
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Old Apr 20, 2006, 04:30 AM   #6
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Here's an update:


John Lennon's sketches sell for $226,000

Wednesday, April 19, 2006; Posted: 9:03 p.m. EDT (01:03 GMT)


LONDON, England (Reuters) -- One of John Lennon's schoolbooks sold for 126,500 pounds ($226,000) at a London auction late on Wednesday, more than 50 years after the former Beatle filled it with colorful sketches and poems.

Lennon was only 12 when he made the 10-page book of drawings in pen, pencil and watercolors alongside handwritten verses from classic English poems.

Auction house Cooper Owen said it was a "vibrant example of the emerging artistic talent" of the Liverpool schoolboy, who went on to sell millions of records with the Beatles. A spokesman declined to name the buyer or the seller.

The collection, called "My Anthology", includes an illustrated verse from the British poet Lewis Carroll's work "The Walrus and the Carpenter".

Cooper Owen said the poem formed part of the inspiration for the surreal Beatles song "I Am the Walrus".
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Old Apr 20, 2006, 08:44 AM   #7
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Wow. Even at 12, you could see how talented he was. Would anyone like to loan me some money, say...a couple hundred thousand?
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