BeatleLinks LogoNav Panel New Sites Cool Sites Top Rated Fab Forum Add A Site Link To Us Revolution Radio New Products



Go Back   BeatleLinks Fab Forum > Solo Forums > Red Rose Speedway


Closed Thread

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Mar 28, 2002, 11:40 PM   #1
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Driving USA Articles

I decided to post this new thread where the articles reguarding Paul's tour can be posted... I know they will be so many, so, better to put them in just a topic

Let's start!

http://www.lvshowbiz.com/feature2.html

A Worldy Presence

After A Year Of Transition, Paul McCartney's Effect On Our Lives Has Never Been More Indelible

By Richard Abowitz

The past year has provided ample opportunity for the public to be reminded of Paul McCartney's virtues, which include being good-natured, a humanitarian, a living legend and--to this day--an artist of awesome talents. Of course, the massive success of the Beatles anthology, One, confirmed that group's timeless appeal. Anyone have doubts? But more surprising to some was the Wings anthology that proved Sir Paul's heaven-sent gift for melodies never left him, even if critics of the day sometimes refused to hear it. A lyrics collection also was published that highlighted McCartney's underestimated poetic gifts. Finally, McCartney recently released Driving Rain--his strongest collection of original material in years. So, it is a good time for us to appreciate this man whose rare tours--all shows are sure sell outs--are frankly more a gift to fans, than for any promotion or for McCartney's profit.

Because of the death of George Harrison and Linda McCartney, though he will turn just 60 in June, McCartney has these days the air of a survivor. But he has never let despair of any sort dominate his music. He was among the first to volunteer his talents after Sept. 11 and he became a comforting presence to New Yorkers in the immediate aftermath. It goes without saying this is an unlikely role for a rock star who is not even a United States citizen.

But McCartney is not like anyone else. He was in the Beatles, and just one of the things that must mean is that he has already deeply touched the life of every person--from waiters, to lawyers, to the President--he will ever meet. Who is going to be unmoved by meeting the author of "Yesterday"? Who? It is a responsibility that McCartney has always handled with admirable grace while continuing to maintain a private life and still remain a creative artist and working musician.

On Driving Rain, some of the new songs like "Lover to a Friend" manage to show McCartney's special vulnerability in a way that has not always been true of his post-Beatles music. Also on Driving Rain, McCartney pulls off some fantastic base-playing and makes plenty of joyful noise. But as good as the new music is, audiences are going to hear McCartney sing the songs that changed their lives, and he obliges, since he has always been as much a showman as an artist.

Critics are frequently accused of being negative, and the reason is that it is much easier to come up with a clever put-down than interesting praise. So, while it sounds foolish and uncritical to say it, the truth is that McCartney is one of the few artists who can't be appreciated or praised enough. If you have a ticket, just take a moment during the show, to appreciate, and I mean truly appreciate, just how lucky you are to be basking in McCartney's performance. Can you imagine what your life would be like without his songs? I can't.

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 01, 2002, 06:19 AM   #2
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

washingtonpost.com

He Can Work It Out: Paul McCartney's Late Passage

By Richard Harrington
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, March 31, 2002; Page G01

It's been a knight's hard day.

After high-profile appearances on two of the year's most watched television programs, the Super Bowl and the Oscars, Sir
Paul McCartney finds himself in Oakland, Calif., working on all the last-minute problems that must be solved by tomorrow,
when he commences his first tour in nearly a decade. Hundreds of thousands of tickets for shows in 19 cities -- including those
at MCI Center April 23 and 24 -- sold out in minutes.

McCartney's sudden omnipresence is, in part, a matter of meticulous planning. This tour would likely have happened to support
"Driving Rain," a CD released in November that has sold somewhat disappointingly. And the Oscar performance was attached
to McCartney's Oscar-nominated song for the Cameron Crowe film "Vanilla Sky."

But events beyond his control have also conspired to bring him back to center stage. In mid-November, McCartney and Ringo
Starr visited George Harrison at a New York hospital -- a poignant last reunion of the three surviving Beatles, just 10 days
before Harrison died of cancer.

At their last meeting, the 59-year-old McCartney got to do with Harrison what the Beatles had sung about so memorably --
hold his hand.

"We'd wanted to hold everyone in the world's hands," McCartney says, "and we'd never managed to hold each other's."

And then there's the Sept. 11 factor: McCartney and his fiancee, Heather Mills, were on the runway at John F. Kennedy
Airport that day, bound for England, when the hijacked airliners struck the World Trade Center towers. Grounded, they
returned toMcCartney's East Hampton home and watched events unfold on television.

McCartney, speaking by telephone Wednesday evening, said he had been close to planning a trip to Russia in conjunction with
the CD's release.

"I wanted to go there and sing 'Back in the USSR' -- I've never done that," he explains. "But we couldn't leave the country, and
in the end, we're glad we couldn't because we had a lot of friends and relatives in New York and it was kind of good to
experience the whole thing with Americans and be right there as the British support group."

McCartney, whose father had been a volunteer fireman in England during World War II, was so moved that he put together the
"Concert for New York" at Madison Square Garden. Intended to aid the families of victims and to honor the heroes, living and
dead, of New York's police and fire departments, the televised October event raised $30 million. There the former Beatle
unveiled the anthemic "Freedom," which he later performed at the Super Bowl.

It became another in a long line of songs by McCartney and/or his former mate John Lennon that provided support for battered
spirits, from "Let It Be" and "Hey Jude" to "Imagine."

"It's funny, isn't it," McCartney muses. "The word 'allies' is apolitical, but certainly since World War II we know in England that
Americans really helped us, and there's a residue of feeling that things might have been different without the Americans."

The year 2001 was one of furious activity, even before September. McCartney published his first collection of poems,
"Blackbird Singing," and embarked on a series of public readings; staged several exhibitions of his paintings, as well as
photographs taken by his late wife, Linda McCartney; and oversaw the release of the "Wingspan" album and documentary,
tracing the '70s success of his "other" group, Wings.

But McCartney's not mired in yesterdays. Four years after the death of his beloved wife and partner of 30 years, and just a few
weeks before his 60th birthday, McCartney is set to marry Mills, a 34-year-old activist for the rights of amputees. Mills, who
lost a leg below the knee when she was hit by a motorcycle, has crusaded to rid the world of land mines and to provide
prosthetic limbs for victims of those mines.

The rumored date is June 6 in New York, but McCartney dismisses this as "newspaper speculation. I can tell you it's not true.
Watch this space for more predictions!

"It's a private thing, particularly in my case," he adds.

Less so will be that June 3 Party at the Palace. That would be Buckingham Palace, site of the 50th anniversary celebration of
Queen Elizabeth II's ascension to the British throne. The house band will include old pals Eric Clapton, Elton John and Phil
Collins.

Will they perform "Her Majesty," McCartney's 22-second tribute that was the last track of the last album the Beatles recorded
together?

"I don't know," McCartney says with a chuckle. "I'd certainly like to. I haven't decided yet, but it looks like a good possibility."

He's also hoping that the royal family responds to a popular movement to award the first-ever posthumous knighthood to
Harrison. In 1965, all four Beatles were awarded the MBE (Member of the British Empire, a middle-ranking honor) and
McCartney became Sir Paul in 1997, despite admitting to having smoked marijuana in the palace loo at the previous ceremony.

McCartney had known Harrison long before he knew Lennon: They took the same city bus to the Liverpool Institute, spending
the hour-long ride talking about guitars and rock-and-roll.

His final visit with Harrison was "very sad," McCartney recalls. "We all knew he was very ill, but we laughed and we joked just
like we always did."

At a certain point that day, he took Harrison's hand. "Being Liverpool guys, I wondered whether it would be the right thing to
do," McCartney says. "But I did -- and for me it was a great blessing and a great memory in the tragedy of him dying, which I
still can't believe. It's difficult to think of my little mate on the bus . . . "

He adds: "There was some light in the gloom. I look for the good in the gloom. It's a strong theme in my life. The way I figure it,
nobody's got that long, so whatever time you have, go, enjoy it. One day you enjoy, the next day you enjoy and you add all
those days and it turns out to be a life, and you've had an enjoyable life. I don't have any deeper philosophy than that."

Sorrow has been a frequent companion for McCartney these past few years, particularly since the passing in April 1998 of his
soul mate, Linda. In 30 years together, their longest separation had been the eight-day week McCartney spent in a Tokyo jail
in 1980 on a marijuana possession charge. The two years between Linda's diagnosis of cancer and her death were followed by
18 months of grieving.

What put McCartney back on the long and winding road to recovery were a pair of projects encouraged by Linda: the
collection of poetry and "Run Devil Run," a 1999 album of classic rock songs. McCartney celebrated Linda's life and work
through a traveling exhibition and two books of her photographs and the continuation of her successful vegetarian food
business.

Even the "Wingspan" project seemed part of a campaign to ensure that Linda's achievements not be underestimated. The
documentary, compiled by their daughter Mary and her husband, was as much love story as band history.

"I knew that Linda wanted to set the record straight and not just leave all these bad criticisms," McCartney says. "So we put
together a record that said: Judge for yourself -- was it any good or wasn't it? That was dealing with the end of a period in my
life, really, with Linda's passing.

"Linda knew I loved rock-and-roll, knew I sang it around the house, and she said, 'You must do a rock record.' It was true of
the poetry book. When you've been married that long, you share things, like I do now with my girlfriend, Heather. I'm very
lucky to have found another great woman."

It was "Magic," a joyful ballad celebrating the night McCartney met Linda Eastman, that truly brought him out of the shadows.

"I found myself looking at the positive aspects of my relationship with Linda and looking to the future with my relationship with
Heather," he says of the song from his current album. "It was one of those things: Can the two live side by side? They seemed
so opposite-ends-of-the-spectrum, but I've found that they do, and I'm very lucky for that."

Another song, "Back in the Sunshine Again" (written with son James), includes the line "Life's too short to be lonely."

"It was a bridge, which is kind of what 'Driving Rain' is about," he says. "I didn't intend it to be like that, but when you look at
what we recorded and what we left off, it's become that, a reference to the past but a bridge into the future."

Such optimism should hardly surprise anyone who knows McCartney's work.

"It's always been my thing. I think it's just something to do with my personality. . . . Some people like movies that are a bit dark
and doomy. I must say, I like them to have an upbeat end, if possible. . . . I don't like to sit in gloom, it's a very difficult state to
be in, so I am always looking for a way out."

He has also spent a lot of time looking after his place in music history. The most written-about musical group in history seemed
to have the final word with 1995's "Beatles Anthology" documentary and accompanying albums and 1999's massive oral
history of the same name. Yet McCartney concurrently authorized Barry Miles's biography, "Many Years From Now."

It's a rich work, particularly in detailing the songwriting collaboration at the heart of the Beatles phenomenon. But it's also a
challenge to the cult of John Lennon, which has only grown since Lennon's murder in 1980.

"It was an answer to the revisionism that was happening at the time," McCartney says. "There were people saying I did nothing
in the Beatles! And I thought it was laughable and many people knew the truth, but it was being put about in some quite high
quarters, and I just thought: 'If that gets on a hard disk 100 years from now, history could end up being rewritten!' I just wanted
people, when they call up data in the future, for my side to be there."

McCartney and Lennon each struggled with their joint legacy, the dozens of pop standards crafted in an unparalleled burst of
creativity between 1962 and 1970. The two had worked together closely at the start of the period, and in a more fragmented
fashion later on, though they continued to share songwriting credit and royalties without regard to who wrote what.

McCartney was the most prolific ex-Beatle -- he recorded more albums than the other three combined -- as well as the most
public, particularly through concert tours. Yet history has seemed to downgrade his role in the Beatles, partly through
oversimplified portraits of the artists as young men. Lennon tends to be cast as the artsy, aggressive, intellectually-politically
passionate Beatle, while McCartney is the soft, sentimental, superficial Beatle, the writer of silly love songs.

Still, in the 100th edition of the British music magazine Mojo, McCartney recently named John Lennon as his hero, citing his
"massive talent, great wit, courage and humor. He influenced me, very much so. Did he ever disappoint me? Yeah, from time to
time, whenever we were having a barney. But only infrequently."

Those tensions "between me and John," he said Wednesday, "are completely resolved. There's no problem. As some people
say, John's camp is another affair."

And the business battles that helped break up the Beatles continue three decades on. When "The Beatles Anthology" was being
put together, McCartney made a special request to Yoko Ono, executor of the Lennon estate, that the songwriting credit on
"Yesterday" -- the most played song in the history of pop radio, which has always been acknowledged as McCartney's solo
creation -- be switched from "Lennon-McCartney" to "McCartney-Lennon." Ono refused.

Part of McCartney's concern has to do with technology. McCartney first recognized a potential problem in a Rome bar where,
sneaking a peek at the pianist's "fake book," saw "Hey Jude" -- another of his solo creations -- credited to "John Lennon"
because there wasn't enough room on the page for both names. A similar problem exists in the Internet world, where limitations
of data storage often knock off the ends of sentences -- or, perhaps, songwriting credits.

Another legacy issue concerns the use of Beatles songs in commercials. Neither McCartney nor Lennon's estates control the
use of these songs. Their publishing rights have long been owned by Michael Jackson, who notoriously sold "Revolution" to
Nike in 1986.

The Super Bowl that featured McCartney's performance in February also signaled the first broadcast of a 30-second Allstate
insurance commercial that made use of "When I'm 64," whose basic melody McCartney wrote when he was 14. Making it
doubly ironic was that the jingle was performed by Julian Lennon. It was the first time he had recorded a Beatles song.

But a new Lennon-McCartney feud is not imminent. "It's a dumb move on the publishing company's part because I don't think
it helps the songs in the long run," McCartney says. "But if anybody's going to do it, I'd rather it be Julian. I've got to laugh at
that."

For "Driving Rain," as with "Run Devil Run," McCartney revisited the Beatles' early methodology, mainly playing his trusted
Hofner bass and singing, leaving additional instrumentation to others. He worked in a Los Angeles studio with a small group
over a short period, looking to recapture the spontaneity and energy of the early '60s. The album, his first of original songs since
Linda's death, received generally positive reviews but has yet to achieve gold status since its November release. His previous
album of originals, 1997's "Flaming Pie," had opened at No. 2 and gone gold in three days.

This has to be disappointing, particularly given the sales of the Beatles "1" compilation (No. 1 in 34 countries, with worldwide
sales of 23 million, including 8 million here) and even "Wingspan" (2 million copies in the United States).

Retrospective material apparently sells itself, while new, unfamiliar material by a mature artist meets a brick wall. Perhaps
McCartney's playing with the notion that his career is in the toilet: The cover of "Driving Rain" is a grainy self-portrait of the
artist in the loo, taken with a tiny camera built into his watch.

He dismisses that interpretation, invoking a previous album-cover furor: "I was not dead when I took my shoes off" walking
across Abbey Road.

In fact, McCartney is doing rather well for someone who's been rumored to be dead for so many years. Last April, the Sunday
Times of London's annual list of the country's wealthiest people crowned McCartney the pop world's first billionaire and 11th
richest person in England, with a wealth estimated at close to $2 billion.

Yet McCartney not only continues to work but does so in new mediums, risking ridicule as much as reward. In 1982, at age
40, he took up painting, a hobby encouraged by his pal . . . Willem de Kooning. But he began exhibiting only in 1999, when a
German gallery sought out his work; the catalogue for that show was published in 2000 as a coffee-table book, "Paul
McCartney Paintings." A show of his paintings, sculpture and photographs opens next month at Liverpool's Walker Art
Gallery.

At age 50, one of the world's best-known lyricists began writing poetry, moved to do so by the death of Ivan Vaughan, a
classmate at the Liverpool Institute with whom McCartney shared a birthday. It was Vaughan who on July 6, 1957, introduced
15-year-old Paul McCartney to another schoolboy chum, 17-year-old John Lennon. When McCartney gave his first public
poetry reading, he did so at Liverpool's Cavern Club on the 40th anniversary of the Beatles' first gig there.

"I'm sure there are people who say, 'Don't do this . . . just rest on your laurels,' " McCartney says. "But I never thought that
was a very good idea."

© 2002 The Washington Post Company


------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 01, 2002, 10:23 AM   #3
shyGirl
Sun King
 
shyGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 17, 2001
Location: Nor. Cal
Posts: 5,796

Default Re: Driving USA Articles

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...1/PK155984.DTL

Ready for the road
Paul McCartney plans lean and mean U.S. tour

Culver City -- Paul McCartney stood in the middle of a vast Los Angeles soundstage, dwarfed by a huge array of video screens. He and his new band were working the kinks out of the former Beatle's first tour in almost a decade, which kicks off tomorrow at the Arena in Oakland.

The warehouse was dimly lit. The soundmen and video choreographers were a football field away. A smattering of onlookers sprawled across two thrift- store couches on the bare concrete floor.

McCartney was trying to coordinate a particular moment in which he'll raise his famous violin-shaped Hofner bass guitar over his head, timed to an accompanying video image above.

He muttered some instructions into the microphone. His amplified voice rattled around the cavernous building. Then he caught himself.

"I hope somebody's listening to me," he joked. "I just got the feeling I was talking to myself."

More than any pop star of the rock 'n' roll era, McCartney has not lacked for an audience. He is, of course, one of the best-selling songwriters and recording artists of all time. The Beatles' astounding achievements have been well-documented, and McCartney's 1970s band, Wings, scored seven No. 1 albums. In 1999 he was named the Greatest Composer of the Last 1,000 Years in a BBC poll, beating out such also-rans as Mozart, Bach and Beethoven.

Of late this world-famous man has been keeping a heightened profile. The Oscars, the Super Bowl, the Concert for New York City: Even for Paul McCartney,

that's called exposure.

"We don't do any shows with an audience less than a billion," teased the ever-merry ex-Beatle, muffling the words around a mouthful of noodles during a break in rehearsal.

The night before he'd worn all black to the Oscars, where he performed "Vanilla Sky," his title track to the recent Cameron Crowe-Tom Cruise movie. Sitting in his comfortable trailer on the studio lot, however, he's in casual mode -- a black T-shirt, an unbuttoned dress shirt plucked from the laundry pile and a pair of plaid flannel pajama bottoms.

"Smelly socks!" he yips, peeling them off.

On the "Driving USA" tour, which will cover 19 cities through May 18 (including the Compaq Center at San Jose on Wednesday), the crowds will be in the 12,000-to-18,000 range. Most of the shows sold out in 15 or 20 minutes.

For McCartney, who turns 60 in June, the excitement is nothing new. One segment of the tour will feature a retrospective of black-and-white Beatles footage on the big screens. With McCartney crooning "All My Loving," it's as thrilling as ever.

The tour will feature songs from all phases of his career -- Beatles classics such as "We Can Work It Out" and "Back in the U.S.S.R.," Wings hits including "Jet" and "Maybe I'm Amazed" and a few cuts from his new album, "Driving Rain."

"I'm doing some stuff I've never done before," he says. An acoustic interlude will be the first time he has ever played guitar onstage without accompaniment, he claims.

"In the early days we used to have John (Lennon) on a crappy little organ." He laughs, mimicking the sound of a cheap keyboard. "We sounded like a little church group."

Clearly McCartney is feeling expansive and reflective. Besides celebrations of his Beatles and Wings careers, the show includes tender tributes to his late wife, Linda, and his late band mate, George Harrison.

His last visit with Harrison came in November, two weeks before George died.

"We were laughing and joking, just like old times," McCartney says. "The only difference, really, was that I was holding his hand."

He looks off for a moment. "Because he was pretty frail, you know. It was very lovely, very emotional, very warm. I came away from the meeting thinking, 'Gosh, I held his hand for the first time in my life.' That was sort of a plus.

I mean, out of this terrible, negative thing came something very positive."

The same might be said of his relationship with Heather Mills, the model and activist McCartney plans to marry this summer, four years after Linda's death. It's obvious that their affection has re-energized him. Mills is the muse of several songs on "Driving Rain."

After recording the album, the couple tooled around Southern California in McCartney's rented Corvette. To hear him tell it, they acted like kids, giggling excitedly each time they played the CD.

"It's one of those cool albums to drive to," McCartney says. "It drives well."

He's extraordinarily wealthy, and his accomplishments are beyond compare. Why go on the road again?

It just feels right, he says. Every time he makes an album, Capitol Records prays that he'll decide to tour.

"I always say, 'We'll see when the record's done,' " he says. This time, the decision was easy: "I like the players. I thought, 'I've got an instant band.' "

"Driving Rain" producer David Kahne, a former San Franciscan who worked on records with Pearl Harbour, Translator, Romeo Void and many other local '80s groups, says he assembled the McCartney band from musicians he knew in Los Angeles.

"Paul met them in the studio and 10 minutes later they were recording," he says. Despite a few trademark intricate arrangements, "Driving Rain" sounds like a live band at work, in the moment.

"That's exactly what I was shooting for," the producer says. "Paul wanted to make a more aggressive record, and so did I."

Of the current group, keyboardist Paul "Wix" Wickens is the only McCartney veteran; he toured in 1989 and 1993. Guitarist Rusty Anderson was in the band Ednaswap and has played with Elton John, Ricky Martin and Sinead O'Connor, among others. He met Kahne working on a Bangles record.

At rehearsal, hefty percussionist Abe Laboriel Jr. thumped his drum kit, his shaved head tilted way back as he sang improbably lovely harmonies into a microphone. Anderson and guitarist Brian Ray added their own effusive backup vocals, such a key component in the McCartney songbook.

In an age of blockbuster performances that require technical wizardry, daredevil physicality and more and more recorded music, it seems the McCartney tour will have a refreshing back-to-basics feel. At the rehearsal, the band was loud, raw and excitable, making even the relative trifle "Coming Up" sound like a force.

"I like that," McCartney says. "If we make a mistake, you'll hear it. We'll have to stop."

He slips into an absurd, too-cool voice for comic effect: "It's on the edge,

man!"

With so many hit songs and fan favorites in the storage bin, making up the set list has been one of McCartney's few headaches. It's a good problem to have.

"We're leaving out things like 'Penny Lane,' " he says. "Anyone else would do that. It's a nice number, a good arrangement."

One of the new songs, the boisterous album-opener "Lonely Road," features a telling line. "I hear your music and it's driving me wild again," McCartney wails.

Lucky ticketholders will know just what he means.




------------------


Song of the moment-Band On The Run
shyGirl's Hideout
shyGirl is offline  
Old Apr 01, 2002, 11:15 PM   #4
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

http://search.news.yahoo.com/search/...&c=news_photos

Pictures from the concert.

Some of the songs played are:

Hello Goodbye
Jet
Here Today
Something
CMoon
My Love.

(I'll hopefully know more later )

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 01, 2002, 11:16 PM   #5
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

Here's another source.. a bit different, or more complete
CB = Complete Band, AS = Acoustic Solo
Hello Goodbye (CB)
Jet (CB)
All My Lovin (CB) (clip with young Beatles and fans screaming)
Getting Better (CB)
Coming Up (CB)
Let Me Roll It (CB)
Lonely Road (CB)
Driving Rain (CB)
Your Loving Flame (CB)
Blackbird (AS)
Every Night (AS)
We Can Work It Out (AS)
Mother Nature's Son (just with an accordion)
Vanilla Sky (AS)
You Never Give Me Your Money (just with a kind of electric keyboard)
/ Carry That Weight (")
Fool On The Hill (CB)
Here Today (just with a piano)
Something (George's pictures in the background, just with ukulele)
Eleanor Rigby (CB)
Here There and Everywhere (CB)
Band On The Run (CB)
Back In The U.S.S.R. (CB, Paul at piano)
Maybe I'm Amazed (")
C Moon (")
My Love (")
Can't Buy Me Love (CB)
Freedom (CB, Paul at guitar)
Live and Let Die (CB - clip from 007)
Let It Be (CB)
Hey Jude (CB, all together singing)

First "Encore":

The Long and Winding Road (CB)
Lady Madonna (CB - clip with famous women, from Anne Frank to a skater)
I Saw Her Standing There (CB)

Second "Encore":

Yesterday (AS)
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart's Club Band (CB)
The End (CB)

[the last list I got]

[This Message Has Been Edited By Amalthea On April 02, 2002 03:23 AM]
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 02, 2002, 07:44 AM   #6
PaulisMine
Dr. Robert
 
PaulisMine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 28, 2002
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 1,320
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

http://apnews1.iwon.com/article/20020402/D7IKN5D00.html


OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) - Paul McCartney has nothing left to prove.

He's a Beatle. He's a knight. He's an honorary American. He's been everywhere, done everything.

But in Oakland Monday night, he showed up simply "to rock 'n' roll." And after a 2 1/2-hourlong feast for the eyes and ears, McCartney had done his job. He left a sell-out crowd of 15,000 satisfied.

With a non-stop set dominated by Beatles tunes from "Can't Buy Me Love" and "Yesterday" to "The End" and "Getting Better," which McCartney claimed had never before been performed in concert, he rocked, he rolled, he paid tribute to John Lennon and George Harrison, but, mostly, he brought the Beatles back to life. And the audience, dominated by gray-haired, 50-somethings who grew up with the Fab Four, loved him for it.


McCartney, who turns 60 in June, hit all the high points of his Beatles, Wings and solo years - a career that now spans more than four decades.

He's one of the best-selling songwriters and recording artists of all time. McCartney's 1970s band, Wings, scored seven No. 1 albums. In 1999, he was named the Greatest Composer of the Last 1,000 Years in a BBC poll, beating Mozart, Bach and Beethoven.

He's kept an especially high profile recently, showing up at the Academy Awards, the Superbowl and the Concert for New York City.

Monday was the opening night of his "Driving USA" tour, which will land in 19 cities through May 18.

A parade of costumed characters, from court jesters carrying balloons to contortionists to a man on stilts and a woman walking on a gigantic rolling ball, began the evening's entertainment. They frolicked in the audience and on stage until McCartney appeared in sillouette on a screen holding his famous violin-shaped Hofner bass guitar high in the air.

He was backed by a group of tight, well-rehearsed Los Angeles musicians, several of whom performed on McCartney's latest release, "Driving Rain."

McCartney was the consummate entertainer. He strained to hit a few high notes, he messed up some lyrics and his voice sounded a bit hoarse at times, but his energy was infectious.

Women screamed when, after a few songs, McCartney stripped off his charcoal jacket and rolled up the sleeves of his gray shirt.

He sang "All My Loving," against a bank of video screens that played black-and-white Beatles footage. He told the story of "Blackbird" and how it was meant to tell about the Civil Rights-era struggle of a young black girl.

The stripped-down, acoustic set, which McCartney says is the first time he's ever played guitar onstage without accompaniment, also featured "We Can Work it Out,""Mother Nature's Son," and "Carry That Weight," during which he was forced to improvise: "This is the part where I don't remember the words. Maybe I'll remember them by the end of the tour," he sang.

No one seemed to mind. The mistakes made him human, made the crowd love him even more. By the time he got to "Hey Jude," it was a full-fledged love-fest, with ear-to-ear grins and waving arms filling the auditorium.

He indulged the crowd with two encores, wrapping things up with "Sgt. Pepper" and fittingly, "The End."

------------------
I ain't no fool and I don't take what I don't want.

[This Message Has Been Edited By PaulisMine On April 02, 2002 08:44 AM]
PaulisMine is offline  
Old Apr 02, 2002, 07:45 AM   #7
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

http://abcnews.go.com/wire/Entertain...20402_238.html

Paul McCartney Opens U.S. TourPaul McCartney Opens U.S. Tour in Oakland With
Concert Steeped in Beatles Tunes
The Associated Press
OAKLAND, Calif. April 2 < Paul McCartney has nothing left to prove.
He's a Beatle. He's a knight. He's an honorary American. He's been
everywhere, done everything.
But in Oakland Monday night, he showed up simply "to rock 'n' roll." And
after a 2 1/2-hourlong feast for the eyes and ears, McCartney had done his
job. He left a sell-out crowd of 15,000 satisfied.
With a non-stop set dominated by Beatles tunes from "Can't Buy Me Love" and
"Yesterday" to "The End" and "Getting Better," which McCartney claimed had
never before been performed in concert, he rocked, he rolled, he paid
tribute to John Lennon and George Harrison, but, mostly, he brought the
Beatles back to life. And the audience, dominated by gray-haired,
50-somethings who grew up with the Fab Four, loved him for it.
McCartney, who turns 60 in June, hit all the high points of his Beatles,
Wings and solo years a career that now spans more than four decades.
He's one of the best-selling songwriters and recording artists of all time.
McCartney's 1970s band, Wings, scored seven No. 1 albums. In 1999, he was
named the Greatest Composer of the Last 1,000 Years in a BBC poll, beating
Mozart, Bach and Beethoven.
He's kept an especially high profile recently, showing up at the Academy
Awards, the Superbowl and the Concert for New York City.
Monday was the opening night of his "Driving USA" tour, which will land in
19 cities through May 18.
A parade of costumed characters, from court jesters carrying balloons to
contortionists to a man on stilts and a woman walking on a gigantic rolling
ball, began the evening's entertainment. They frolicked in the audience and
on stage until McCartney appeared in sillouette on a screen holding his
famous violin-shaped Hofner bass guitar high in the air.
He was backed by a group of tight, well-rehearsed Los Angeles musicians,
several of whom performed on McCartney's latest release, "Driving Rain."
McCartney was the consummate entertainer. He strained to hit a few high
notes, he messed up some lyrics and his voice sounded a bit hoarse at times,
but his energy was infectious.
Women screamed when, after a few songs, McCartney stripped off his charcoal
jacket and rolled up the sleeves of his gray shirt.
He sang "All My Loving," against a bank of video screens that played
black-and-white Beatles footage. He told the story of "Blackbird" and how it
was meant to tell about the Civil Rights-era struggle of a young black girl.
The stripped-down, acoustic set, which McCartney says is the first time he's
ever played guitar onstage without accompaniment, also featured "We Can Work
it Out," "Mother Nature's Son," and "Carry That Weight," during which he was
forced to improvise: "This is the part where I don't remember the words.
Maybe I'll remember them by the end of the tour," he sang.
No one seemed to mind. The mistakes made him human, made the crowd love him
even more. By the time he got to "Hey Jude," it was a full-fledged
love-fest, with ear-to-ear grins and waving arms filling the auditorium.
He indulged the crowd with two encores, wrapping things up with "Sgt.
Pepper" and fittingly, "The End."

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 02, 2002, 07:59 AM   #8
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

From LA Times, no link.

Tuesday, April 2, 2002

POP MUSIC REVIEW
Steeped in Memories
Paul McCartney isn't calling it a farewell, but his tour opens on a
nostalgic note.

By ROBERT HILBURN, Times Staff Writer

OAKLAND-By opening his first concert tour in nine years Monday with
"Hello, Goodbye," Paul McCartney touched
Photos by KEN HIVELY / Los Angeles Times

on a key question: Is the former Beatle just saying hello again in these
shows, or is he saying goodbye?
McCartney wrote the lighthearted number about the uncertainty of
relationships in 1967, and he apparently views it as such a minor part of
his repertoire that he didn't include it in "Blackbird Singing," his recent
book of lyrics and poetry.
But the upbeat song was the ideal opener for the concert at the Arena
in Oakland. After the deaths of prominent members of the Beatles family
raised questions about whether we are coming to the end of this long and
winding road in rock history, it offered reassurance.

I say high, you say low ... .
You say stop, I say go, go, go ...
I don't know why you say goodbye
I say hello.

There's no word in pop culture more transcendent than "Beatles," a
point that has been underscored each time the

classic '60s rock band's music is embraced by a new generation of fans.
From the exhilaration of "I Saw Her Standing There" to the comforting
strains of "Let It Be" and "Hey Jude," the Beatles' music has been
remarkably immune for four decades to the shifts in style and taste that
render most pop acts quickly disposable.

The possibility that this could be the last time around for McCartney,
who turns 60 on June 18, no doubt contributed to the box office heat of the
seven-week tour, which includes stops May 4 at Staples Center in Los Angeles
and May 5 at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim. During that time, he'll be seen
by more than 400,000 people, generating an estimated $50 million.
In a pre-tour interview, McCartney downplayed the notion that this is a
farewell tour.
"I'm a little cynical about ever saying something is a farewell tour
because so many people have said they were [bowing out]

and they came back," he said during a break from rehearsal last week on a
movie sound stage in Culver City. "Besides, I always thought I would live
until about 90 and the estimate is going up. I will probably be wheeled up
on stage, and sing [in a shaky voice] 'Yes-ter-daaaaay.'"
Yet it's also clear that McCartney isn't one of those musicians who
live for the road. He's only done four tours in the 32 years since the
breakup of the Beatles.
Even more to the point, McCartney and his fans have seen enough of
life's unexpected twists
The Coggin family--Sean, left, Beth, Chris and Steve--at the Paul McCartney
concert. "It's a memory we'll always share," Steve says.

and turns to know that nothing is certain. The tour comes in the still
tender aftermath of the cancer-related deaths of his wife, Linda, in 1998
and Beatles guitarist George Harrison last year.
In putting together this tour, McCartney understands that the shows are
about more than music. They're also about community and a shared history.
The emphasis was on intimacy and warmth Monday, including a lengthy acoustic
session in which he saluted the late John Lennon and Harrison, dedicating a
song to each.
Waiting for the arena doors to open Monday, numerous fans expressed the
belief that this could be their last chance to celebrate the legacy of the
Beatles. Drummer Ringo Starr is the other surviving member, but McCartney,
along with Lennon, wrote most of the material, and is viewed as the more
essential connection.
"We drove 11 hours to see this," said Matt Jarvis, 47, who owns a radio
station in Waldpoint, Ore. He was standing with his girlfriend and her
12-year-old daughter. "I've been a fan 40 years and never seen the Beatles,
and I figure this might be our last chance."
Steve Coggin, 43, a roofer in the Bay Area, stood nearby with his two
sons, 12 and 11. "I've seen every one of Paul's tours, but this one is
special because [the boys] can see him too. It's a memory we'll always
share."
It's been almost 40 years since the English quartet captured the hearts
of America in a single TV appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show," and the
sense of connection remains strong.
In the early minutes of Monday's concert, McCartney reached back to
some of the Beatles' first hits, including "All My Lovin'," one of the songs
performed on the group's historic 1964 Sullivan show appearance. Of some
three dozen songs on the set list, about half were from his Beatles period.
But he also found room to showcase his later songs, including "Jet," "Live
and Let Die" and "Let Me Roll It."
McCartney's post-Beatles work has been strikingly uneven, but he chose
the best of that material for the show. After a high-energy first half-hour
that included three of the most engaging songs from his recent album,
"Driving Rain," the bassist undertook the evening's most dramatic move when
he excused his band (Paul "Wix" Wickens on keyboards, Abe Laboriel Jr. on
drums, and Rusty Anderson and Brian Ray on guitars) and performed 11 of his
most endearing tunes in solo format, playing mainly acoustic guitar.
Rather than just the hits, he sprinkled in some less obvious Beatles
numbers, including "Blackbird," his civil rights anthem from 1968 that
features one of McCartney's loveliest melodies, and "Mother Nature's Son,"
an expression of environmental awareness from the same period.
The most tender moment, however, came when he saluted his deceased
bandmates. He toasted Lennon, who was murdered in 1980, with "Here Today," a
1982 song about their relationship.
"When people are around, it's not always easy to tell them what you
feel," McCartney told the 14,000 fans. "After my dear friend John passed on,
I wrote this song."
The tune acknowledges the much-publicized tensions between the pair
over the Beatles' breakup in 1970, but concludes by saying, "But as for me/I
still remember how it was before/And I'm holding back the tears no more/I
love you."
Then, accompanying himself on ukulele, McCartney sang Harrison's most
tender ballad, "Something."
The audience applauded the "I love you" line in "Here Today" and sang
along on the more familiar "Something." (McCartney saved his salute to Linda
for later in the concert with "My Love," one of several songs inspired by
their relationship.)
At the rehearsal in Los Angeles last week, McCartney said that he put
the show together by trying to look at it from the audience's perspective.
"If I were going to see Bob Dylan, for instance, I'd want to hear 'Mr.
Tambourine Man.' So I just thought, 'What would someone want to hear if they
were coming to see me?'
"Then I added a few of my own ideas, like the George thing with the
ukulele. I used to play 'Something' at home with the ukulele long before
[Harrison's illness]. George was a big ukulele fan. At the end of George's
evening, the ukulele always came out. It was like the port."
McCartney got the idea for the long acoustic segment while doing poetry
readings last year to promote his book.
"I enjoyed just being alone in front of an audience and thought it
would be a good idea to go one on one in the concert in some way," he said.
It was a daring move because it's hard to hold an audience's attention
for a long time without a band in an arena setting.
But in that remarkable segment, McCartney and his audience didn't need
any other musicians-they had 40 years of memories to accompany them. It was
a memorable moment that stepped beyond pop-rock conventions to create an
intimacy and warmth that lived up to the most endearing and inspiring
moments of the Beatles' legacy.

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 02, 2002, 09:20 AM   #9
darkhorse
Sun King
 
darkhorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 20, 2001
Location: Santiago, Chile
Posts: 11,086
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Tahoma, Arial, Sans-Serif">Quote:</font><HR>Originally Posted By Amalthea:
"Then I added a few of my own ideas, like the George thing with the ukulele. I used to play 'Something' at home with the ukulele long before [Harrison's illness]. George was a big ukulele fan. At the end of George's
evening, the ukulele always came out. It was like the port."
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>That is hauntingly unexpected. And beautiful of course.

Thanks sir Paul. I didn't even see the show and I have some teardrops in my face.

"It feels like I've been taking over from the rain".

(Just realized this post doesn't belong here. Sorry for posting it in the wrong thread. )

------------------
"The guiding light in all your love shines on,
The only lover worth it all, your love is forever"
~ George, 1979

[This Message Has Been Edited By darkhorse On April 02, 2002 10:23 AM]
darkhorse is offline  
Old Apr 02, 2002, 01:41 PM   #10
shyGirl
Sun King
 
shyGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 17, 2001
Location: Nor. Cal
Posts: 5,796

Default Re: Driving USA Articles

McCartney's rock of ages
McCartney opens U.S. concert tour to generations of Bay Area admirers

URL: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...DTL&type=music

Eight-year-old Oona Murley wasn't even alive the last time Paul McCartney rolled through the Bay Area, but she was there last night, way up in the nosebleed seats, singing along as Sir Paul belted out one classic hit after another.

She knew most of the words, too, and screamed herself silly with her 10- year-old sister Hannah and their 40-year-old mother, Sandy Hollimon.

That's right. Rock 'n' roll is now family fare. The music your parents hated is the music your kids adore.

"His music is timeless," said Hollimon, who lives near Fort Ross in Sonoma County. "(My kids) respond to it because it is of the highest quality."

That much was clear last night at sold-out Oakland Arena, where the 59-year- old McCartney launched his first concert tour since 1993. The great custodian of the Beatles' heritage left a multigenerational audience of 18,000 screaming for more as they followed him down memory lane.

"It's a link to our past," said Terry Barnes of Santa Rosa, who celebrated her 48th birthday by seeing a singer she has adored since childhood. "We watched them grow up as we grew up."

The appeal of McCartney and, by extension, the Beatles, transcends generations. Aging Baby Boomers danced alongside their kids, and a fair number of teens and twenty-somethings left mom and dad at home to see a man pushing 60 perform songs written before they were born.

"The bottom line is the music," said Rick Garcia, 25, of San Jose. "Good music is good music. It unites everybody."


WELL, NOT EVERYONE
The concert came on the same night the Oakland A's opened their season, and baseball fans couldn't quite understand all the fuss over an aging rock star.

"I don't really like the Beatles," said Alonzo Green, 38, who drove down from Weed (Siskiyou County) with his 3-year-old son Beniah to see the A's beat the Texas Rangers. "I can watch Paul McCartney on VH1."

McCartney fans are a lot like Grateful Dead fans but with deeper pockets and better fashion sense. They'll travel ridiculous distances and spend absurd amounts of money to see a man who, like the late Jerry Garcia, holds mystical power over them.

At 47, Rick Glover has seen McCartney perform more times than he can remember and skipped his own wedding anniversary to be there last night. He spent $250 to fly in from Atlanta and $285 for his concert ticket -- and another $285 for a ticket to tonight's sold-out performance in San Jose.

"I'm looking at spending two grand for these two shows," he said nonchalantly. "And that doesn't count the T-shirts."

Oh yes. The official souvenir T-shirts. They started at 40 bucks. The fancy tie-dyed ones went for $65. Mike McAllister, 42, of Sussex County, N.J., bought one. And an official tour program. And an official tour magnet. He decided against the official tour ball cap.

"It was cheap -- $105 for everything," he said with a grin.


REMEMBER WHEN, IN '64
The cheap seats -- if they could be called that -- were $50. But the folks streaming into Oakland Arena were only too happy to add to McCartney's vast fortune. Many have been fans since childhood and remember staring, transfixed, as the Beatles performed on the Ed Sullivan Show.

"Feb. 9, 1964. Sunday. Eight o'clock," said Jane Law, 50, of Danville. "It's burned into my memory."

Law's 15-year-old son Andrew has seen the performance, too, albeit on videotape. He shares his mother's love for a band both agree changed the world.

"I grew up with it," Andrew said. "I can remember being 5 years old and hearing 'Hey Jude' for the first time. It goes beyond generations. His music appeals to everyone."

It helps that McCartney is such a nice guy. John Lennon may have been the band's tormented genius, George Harrison its introspective mystic and Ringo Starr its jovial clown, but McCartney was, for many fans, the one with the common touch.

"He's an Everyman," Andrew said. "Well, a really rich, godlike Everyman."

Even at his age, McCartney -- who still looks pretty much like he did when Beatlemania swept America in 1964 -- can still make the girls swoon.

"He is so charming," said 20-year-old Ida Mazmanian of Orinda. Apparently charming is what they call someone too old to be called cute.

Mazmanian's 14-year-old sister, Rose, wasn't so sure.

"I actually like Ringo the best," she said. "But Paul's good, too."

Jeremy Hull, 20, of Pleasant Hill, couldn't care less about any of them. As his mother headed into the arena to see McCartney, he and several friends wandered over to Network Associates Coliseum for the A's game.

"I like the A's, man," he said. "These crazy hippies can have their Paul McCartney. I'm here for baseball."


------------------


Song of the moment-Band On The Run
shyGirl's Hideout
shyGirl is offline  
Old Apr 03, 2002, 12:06 AM   #11
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

Sir Paul's tribute to lost friends

http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/ent...00/1906832.stm

Sir Paul McCartney paid an emotional tribute to his late wife Linda and his Beatles bandmates, John Lennon and George Harrison, as he kicked off his US tour.
The star fought back tears as he performed Harrison's classic song Something on a ukulele.

Sir Paul sang to 15,000 fans at the Oakland Coliseum, near San Francisco, on the first stop of his Driving USA tour - his first US tour in 10 years.

He told the audience Harrison often used to entertain friends on a ukulele and was a great fan of George Formby.

"George [Harrison] was a great ukulele player and whenever you went to his house, he'd play it at the end of the night. I showed him I could play the song on the ukulele and tonight I'd like to do it now as my tribute."

The 59-year-old also played My Love, which he wrote for Linda, who passed away in 1998, when they performed in Wings together.

Murder

The audience were moved to a standing ovation as Sir Paul completed his tribute to former Beatle John Lennon.

For the first time Sir Paul sang Here Today, the song he wrote following the murder of Lennon in New York in 1980.

San Francisco witnessed the final Beatles paying concert in 1966, a 30-minute show which saw just 12 songs played.

But Sir Paul kept the crowd entertained for much longer as he played a total of 36 songs from his back catalogue.

The multi-millionaire played a selection of Beatles and Wings numbers as well as his old and new solo material.

"When I was picking what songs to play, I imagined myself sitting in the audience and thinking 'Right, what would I want to hear him play?'" said Sir Paul.

The final selection included Back In The USSR, Can't Buy Me Love, All My Loving, Live And Let Die and Getting Better.

His fiancee Heather Mills could be seen dancing in the aisle.

Macca finished his set with Yesterday, Sgt Pepper and The End.

"Thanks, it's been great getting back here to rock you," he told the crowd.

The Driving USA tour takes in 19 venues across America.


------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 03, 2002, 12:10 AM   #12
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Tahoma, Arial, Sans-Serif">Quote:</font><HR>Originally Posted By darkhorse:
[B(Just realized this post doesn't belong here. Sorry for posting it in the wrong thread. )[/b]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

lol, no, it's ok! You were referring to the article, then, it's ok

---
http://www.cnn.com/2002/SHOWBIZ/Musi....ap/index.html

Review: McCartney concert steeped in Beatles tunes


By Kim Curtis
Associated Press

OAKLAND, California (AP) -- Paul McCartney has nothing left to prove.

He's a Beatle. He's a knight. He's an honorary American. He's been everywhere, done everything.

But in Oakland Monday night, he showed up simply "to rock 'n' roll." And after a 2 1/2-hourlong feast for the eyes and ears, McCartney had done his job. He left a sell-out crowd of 15,000 satisfied.

With a non-stop set dominated by Beatles tunes from "Can't Buy Me Love" and "Yesterday" to "The End" and "Getting Better," which McCartney claimed had never before been performed in concert, he rocked, he rolled, he paid tribute to John Lennon and George Harrison, but, mostly, he brought the Beatles back to life. And the audience, dominated by gray-haired, 50-somethings who grew up with the Fab Four, loved him for it.

McCartney, who turns 60 in June, hit all the high points of his Beatles, Wings and solo years -- a career that now spans more than four decades.

He's one of the best-selling songwriters and recording artists of all time. McCartney's 1970s band, Wings, scored seven No. 1 albums. In 1999, he was named the Greatest Composer of the Last 1,000 Years in a BBC poll, beating Mozart, Bach and Beethoven.

He's kept an especially high profile recently, showing up at the Academy Awards, the Superbowl and the Concert for New York City.

McCartney sang Beatles classics including "All My Loving," "We Can Work it Out" and "The End."
A parade of costumed characters, from court jesters carrying balloons to contortionists to a man on stilts and a woman walking on a gigantic rolling ball, began the evening's entertainment. They frolicked in the audience and on stage until McCartney appeared in silhouette on a screen holding his famous violin-shaped Hofner bass guitar high in the air.

He was backed by a group of tight, well-rehearsed Los Angeles musicians, several of whom performed on McCartney's latest release, "Driving Rain."

McCartney was the consummate entertainer. He strained to hit a few high notes, he messed up some lyrics and his voice sounded a bit hoarse at times, but his energy was infectious.

Women screamed when, after a few songs, McCartney stripped off his charcoal jacket and rolled up the sleeves of his gray shirt.

He sang "All My Loving," against a bank of video screens that played black-and-white Beatles footage. He told the story of "Blackbird" and how it was meant to tell about the Civil Rights-era struggle of a young black girl.

The stripped-down, acoustic set, which McCartney says is the first time he's ever played guitar onstage without accompaniment, also featured "We Can Work it Out," "Mother Nature's Son," and "Carry That Weight," during which he was forced to improvise: "This is the part where I don't remember the words. Maybe I'll remember them by the end of the tour," he sang.

No one seemed to mind. The mistakes made him human, made the crowd love him even more. By the time he got to "Hey Jude," it was a full-fledged love-fest, with ear-to-ear grins and waving arms filling the auditorium.

He indulged the crowd with two encores, wrapping things up with "Sgt. Pepper" and fittingly, "The End."

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 03, 2002, 12:13 AM   #13
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

It includes a picture of Paul with a ukulele during the tribute to George.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main...03/wpaul03.xml


Sad refrain for lost Beatles on Paul's hit tour

SIR Paul McCartney was poised last night to make at least £37 million in his first American tour for a decade with 400,000 fans in 19 cities paying up to £178 for tickets, a record for a rock performer.

However, no one seemed to blink at the cost, with a box office rush sparked by reports that McCartney was making his last appearances. All dates sold out within minutes.

Paul McCartney plays his ukelele in tribute to George Harrison
The singer, who will be 60 on June 18, said: "I'm a little cyncial about ever saying something is a farewell tour because so many people have said they were bowing out and they came back.

"Besides, I've thought I would live until about 90, and the estimate is going up. I will probably be wheeled up on stage, and sing, in a shaky voice, Yester-daaaaay."

He opened the seven-week tour at Oakland, outside San Francisco, where the Beatles played their last paying concert in 1966.

The Oakland performance comprised 36 songs, 21 of them by the Beatles, including I Saw Her Standing There, Let It Be and All My Loving.

For John Lennon, who was murdered in 1980, he played Here Today, a 1982 song about their relationship. He told the audience of 14,000: "When people are around, it's not always easy to tell them what you feel. After my dear friend John passed on, I wrote this song."

At one point he played a ukelele and sang Something in tribute to George Harrison, a fan of George Formby. He told the crowd: "George was a great ukelele player. Whenever you went to his house he'd play it at the end of the night."

In June McCartney will perform at the Queen's Golden Jubilee concert at Buckingham Palace.

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 03, 2002, 12:15 AM   #14
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

http://www.usatoday.com/life/music/2...-mccartney.htm

McCartney is the busy Beatle

By Edna Gunderson, USA TODAY

Paul McCartney opened a 19-city tour in Oakland on Monday.

LOS ANGELES — He's a real everywhere man. Last year, Paul McCartney
published poetry tome Blackbird Singing, released the retrospective Wingspan
CD set and documentary, recorded new album Driving Rain, penned 9/11 anthem
Freedom and helped raise $30 million for terror victims by spearheading The
Concert for New York City all-star show and album. His profile exploded in
2002 with globe-circling appearances on the Super Bowl and Oscar telecasts.


"Now we're only playing audiences of a billion or more," he quips. So where
does a knighted ex-Beatle go to surpass himself? "Oakland," he says
matter-of-factly.

The punch line isn't really incongruous. On Monday, McCartney, 59, took the
stage in the Bay Area city to launch his 19-city Driving USA tour, the
season's hottest ticket. About 200,000 ducats to 14 shows sold out in under
a half-hour. The fact that fans are coughing up $50 to $250 ($125 to $350 in
Las Vegas) to catch McCartney's unembellished production contradicts
conventional wisdom in the ailing pop market. He's determined to prove a
musician can sell out an arena and not sell out his art.

"People like me and Neil Young and Bob Dylan and even U2, we're from a time
you just played live, and the idea of playing with tapes is something you'd
never consider," he says. "Today, the excuse is, 'Well, we've got to dance a
lot. We're out of breath, so we can't sing.' Well, Fred Astaire could. Time
it so you can do both.

"I suppose if I had a real aggressive modern manager, he might say, 'Paul,
come on, we'll get a bunch of girls and guys, they can all dance, you can
look real cute and be wheeled out on a podium, do some nice numbers with an
orchestra.' It's not my thing. However, I am thinking of wearing just the
boxer shorts on stage. No choreography, just me standing there. Then I whip
them off during the second number. I think we can make some headlines."

That won't be necessary. McCartney believes there's a place for his
unadorned pop tunes, even in this age of "synthetic music, boy bands and a
lot of girls not wearing much." He has loosely structured a set list that
spans his career from The Beatles (All My Loving, Back in the U.S.S.R.) to
Wings (Jet) to solo flights (Maybe I'm Amazed and four cuts from Driving
Rain).

Days before the tour kickoff, he's casually rehearsing in a cavernous
soundstage at Sony Studios with guitarist Rusty Anderson and drummer Abe
Laboriel Jr. (both on Rain), plus newly adopted guitarist/bassist Brian Ray
and veteran Paul "Wix" Wickens, the keyboardist on McCartney's '90 and '93
outings.

After they zip through a bouncy version of Driving Rain, McCartney, clad in
a tan T-shirt and olive pants, stands alone at the microphone to sing
Blackbird, Mother Nature's Son and We Can Work It Out ("Was this written
after an argument? You tell me," he queries a tiny assembly of crewmembers
and visitors). The band returns for an acoustic reading of Vanilla Sky.
Run-throughs have been kept to a minimum to ensure room for spontaneity.

"If we make a mistake, you'll hear it!" he promises during a break in his
trailer. Plopping onto a sofa, McCartney kicks off his sneakers, removes his
watch and digs into a vegetarian lunch of salad and sliced spring rolls.
Loudly munching carrot sticks, he glances at the tape recorder and says
apologetically, "I hope you'll be able to understand this later."

Despite a nine-year break from the road, McCartney is remarkably relaxed
about this stage comeback, particularly in light of critically acclaimed
Rain's drizzle at cash registers. The album, no longer in Billboard's top
200, sold 2,700 copies last week for a 19-week total of 322,000. By
contrast, the Beatles 1 hits disc, at No. 148 after 71 weeks, sold 8,800
copies last week for a U.S. take of 8.1 million (23 million worldwide).

"You never know if people are going to like a record," he says. "I like the
record a lot. I was enjoying playing it, really loving it. Then it came out,
and it didn't scream to No. 1. It didn't even dash to No. 1. It was pretty
disappointing. But you can't go and cry. You just think, 'What happened?' I
have no idea. The record company (Capitol) was in a bit of disarray. They
chose a first single (From a Lover to a Friend) I wouldn't have chosen."

McCartney, worth an estimated $2 billion, says he's not hitting the road for
money. Nor is he capitulating to label pressure.

"Record companies like you to tour," he concedes. "That's probably why I
didn't do it sooner. I don't like to be told what to do."

He isn't bored creatively (his painting exhibit opens next month in a
Liverpool gallery) or professionally. He's plenty busy with projects both
imagined (an oft-discussed but unplanned Beatles 1 sequel) and real. He's
especially excited about a budding Let It Be reissue. "We're cleaning up the
film and going back to the original tape, before (producer) Phil Spector got
hold of it," he says.

A gratifying personal life competes with a harried work agenda. He's no
longer seeking to fill a void left by wife Linda's death in 1998. In June,
he's expected to marry former model Heather Mills, an activist who lost her
leg in a motorcycle accident and now promotes land-mine bans.

"I'm very lucky to have found a great woman," he says. "I wondered after
Linda whether I would."

So why complicate an idyllic romance with a demanding tour?

"For my own fun," he says.

Delighted but not surprised by the rush for tickets, he adds, "I'm not
blasé. I never know whether people will want to see me. But I think people
will like the fact that this show's very live. I'm taking that a bit
further, daring to do stuff totally alone, just me and a guitar and 15,000
people. That will be a little nerve-racking, because I've never done it
before. I don't play safe. I sometimes wish I would so it would be a bit
easier. I think of Elvis in Vegas with 36 musicians — you can walk off, and
they'll keep playing."

McCartney prefers to carry that weight himself, even if it means risking
bloopers. He recalls a botched Penny Lane at a Paris concert: "I said,
'Stop, stop, stop! Pardonez moi. We've made une mistake, but je suis man
enough to admit it.' That keeps it interesting."

After avoiding Beatles tunes early in his solo career, McCartney is
embracing his Fab Four legacy. The challenge in culling material from four
decades was whittling the list to a two-hour sampler.

"It's a luxury to have too many songs," he says. "At this point, there are a
lot of hits, but we're leaving out things like Penny Lane. We discovered in
the Beatles days that people like to hear the hits. We do Rock and Roll
Music: 'Yay!' Then Can't Buy Me Love: 'YAY!' And here's something completely
different: Baby's in Black. They'd all go (limply), 'Yay. Great, not even a
B-side.' We had to hold our nerve and (settle for) a quieter round of
applause."

McCartney will undoubtedly encounter louder cheers for two key selections
honoring late comrades. He'll perform Here Today, the 1982 Tug of War track
penned for John Lennon, and Something, George Harrison's signature.

"It's sad, now that there's only two Beatles left," the suddenly sullen
McCartney says. He won't divulge conversations he and fellow survivor Ringo
Starr have shared since Harrison died of cancerNov. 29. "We've talked a few
times, just private talk. It's a great sadness for us, as it is for his
family and all his friends. It's horrible. But George had a wonderful
personal philosophy and always wanted to see his sweet lord. With that in
mind, plus the knowledge that we're all going sometime, it's probably sadder
for us than it was for him."

Shortly before Harrison's death, McCartney paid a visit to his bedside and,
for the first time in their long and winding history, clutched his hand.
Harrison was frail but in high spirits.

"The last time I saw him, he was laughing and joking, and he wasn't well at
all. It's madness, laughing in the face of that. He just had this Liverpool
sense of humor."

McCartney, who rarely utters a gloomy remark that might cloud his
perpetually sunny personality, briefly drops his guard.

"Obviously, we know there'll come a point when the Beatles aren't alive," he
says. "It will be a sad day, because they were a damn good group. I wanted
us all to ride off into the sunset, singing and maybe whistling, George
playing a ukulele and John being witty. It just doesn't work out that way."

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 03, 2002, 07:08 AM   #15
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

http://www.sacramento.com/portal/mus...-2300476c.html

Review: Nearing 60, McCartney can't be beat
By David Barton -- Bee Staff Writer
(Published 6:14 a.m. PST Wednesday, Apr. 3, 2002)

OAKLAND -- Since the demise of the Beatles 32 years ago, Paul McCartney's career has had a great many artistic ups and downs. Despite his world-changing contributions to popular music and culture, he is generally taken for granted.

But Monday night, as he stood at the front of the Oakland Arena stage and led his band into his first full U.S. concert tour in nine years, McCartney pulled together the elements of his 40-year career in a dazzling show that was all highs.

Leading a sharp quartet through four decades in an all-too-brief 2 ½ hours, McCartney sounded remarkably good, hitting notes that his contemporaries haven't hit in years, and reveling in the enduring appeal of his songs.

He also struck a balance between showbiz dazzle, with a complex and evocative video set and an opening sequence featuring a dozen or more actors in elaborate costumes, and a stripped-down musical approach that saw him playing nearly a third of the show's 37 songs solo, or nearly so, on piano or acoustic guitar.

But the power of the show was rooted in a band -- McCartney on bass, guitar and piano; Abe Laboriel Jr. on drums; Paul "Wix" Wickens on keyboards; and Rusty Anderson and Brian Ray on guitars, with all on expert backing vocals -- that was the best McCartney has fronted since the Beatles folded.

The quintet hit the sold-out crowd of 18,000 hard from the opening sequence, a string of powerhouse classics: "Hello Goodbye," "Jet" and "All My Loving," a 2-to-1 Beatles-to-McCartney/Wings song ratio that would roughly hold through the evening.

At the top, McCartney fumbled a cue in "Hello Goodbye," skipping a section of the bridge, but the band recovered quickly, and by the second song, they were firing on all cylinders and cruising into the Driving USA Tour.

McCartney, who turns 60 in June, played and sang like a man half his age. While he has consistently made albums over the years, he has rarely toured, undertaking only four post-Beatles U.S. tours in 35 years (1976, 1990, 1993 and this year), so his ability to hold his own on stage was not a foregone conclusion.

But the man who wrote "When I'm Sixty-Four" when he was 24 sounded anything but retiring.

Always possessed of a clear, bell-like voice, as well as a serious rock 'n' roll wail, McCartney exercised both to good effect Monday night, on songs from rockers like "Back in the U.S.S.R.," "I Saw Her Standing There" and "Lady Madonna" to ballads such as "Maybe I'm Amazed," "The Long and Winding Road" and "Let It Be."

Unexpected solo-era songs like the bouncy "Coming Up," the stark "Let Me Roll It" and even an obscure early '70s B-side, the reggae-inspired "C Moon," were a pleasure to hear, and three songs from the recent "Driving Rain" album came off well.

But while the show was all highs, there were several singular moments, as on the fourth song, when McCartney noted that, though he'd written the next song in the 1960s, this was the first time he had performed it on stage. He then launched into "Getting Better" from "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" with the gusto of a youngster discovering a great old song and making it his, led by Anderson's ringing guitar intro, the band playing around with the song's original recorded fade. The sound was a perfect re-creation of the original, as were most of the evening's songs, but they never sounded like museum pieces in the hands of the band, driven by Laboriel's slamming drum work.

But the emotional core of the show came when the band left the stage, except for only brief supporting cameos, and McCartney performed solo for the next 10 songs.

Here, starting with "Blackbird," which McCartney explained was written as a tribute to African American women during the civil rights movement, he played songs including "We Can Work It Out," "Mother Nature's Son," "The Fool on the Hill," the recent "Vanilla Sky" and a gorgeous "Eleanor Rigby." McCartney connected directly with the audience, drawing repeated standing ovations, sing-alongs and the evening's emotional highlight: songs dedicated to his fallen comrades John Lennon, slain in 1980, and George Harrison, who died late last year.

For Lennon, who was murdered in 1980, he played "Here Today," a knowing, bittersweetly humorous tribute to his late musical partner that originally appeared 20 years ago. To honor Harrison, he grabbed a ukulele, explaining that "George was a great ukulele player," and did a lovely, old-timey version of Harrison's "Something."

His tributes were neither maudlin nor cloying, two words often hurled against McCartney, and his greatest tribute, and greatest restraint, was the utter absence of any reference to his greatest loss of all: the death of his wife and collaborator, Linda McCartney, who died in April 1998. The lack of any mention of her only underlined her importance to him as the band returned and performed a series of songs over which she hovered: a gorgeous re-creation of the Beatles' "Here, There and Everywhere" and the solo and Wings classics "Band on the Run," "Maybe I'm Amazed" and "My Love." Still, Linda McCartney's face appeared only once on the video screen, and only as a member of Wings.

It showed a taste, restraint and, ultimately, heart that McCartney doesn't get credit for often enough.

That sequence was followed by another that evoked post-9/11 America, from the obvious new anthem "Freedom," which sounded better live than it does on record, to the explosive (literally) "Live and Let Die" and the somber "Let It Be," during which candles filled the video monitors. The set ended with "Hey Jude," McCartney enthusiastically leading a sing-along.

After a quick run off the stage, the band was back for a string of six Beatles songs as encores, including a poignant "Yesterday," which has gained great sadness with the 37 years since he wrote it, and then the upbeat "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)," and finally "The End," the last song on the last Beatle album, and the words that will most likely serve as McCartney's epitaph:

"And in the end/The love you take/Is equal to the love you make."

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 04, 2002, 01:16 PM   #16
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

There's also a pic of HM dancing
http://www.hellomagazine.com/2002/04/03/macca/

3 APRIL 2002
Sir Paul McCartney fought back the tears as he paid an emotional tribute to former bandmates John Lennon and George Harrison, and his late wife Linda, on the first night of his US tour on Tuesday.

Performing in front of 15,000 fans at the Oakland Coliseum, near San Francisco, the former Beatle delivered a stirring version of Harrison’s enduring classic Something on the ukulele. Paul told the audience that Harrison – who died from cancer last year – often liked to entertain friends on his ukulele and was a massive fan of George Formby.

“George was a great ukulele player and whenever you went to his house he’d play it at the end of the night,” said the 59-year-old musician. “I showed him I could play the song on the ukulele and tonight I’d like to do it now as a tribute.”

Sir Paul also played My Love, which he wrote for Linda, who passed away in 1998, when they performed in Wings together.

And for the first time he played Here Today, a song he wrote after the murder of John Lennon in New York in 1980. Paul told the crowd: “When people are around, it’s not always easy to tell them what you feel. After my dear friend John passed on I wrote this song.” As it came to an end, the audience leapt to their feet in a tearful standing ovation.

The concert was the opening gig of Sir Paul’s Driving USA tour – his first north American tour in nine years – which is poised to make the former Beatle at least £37 million. Four hundred thousand fans in 19 cities nationwide have paid up to £178 a ticket, a record for a rock performer


------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 06, 2002, 04:24 AM   #17
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

Pic from Vegas
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...170/1d20i.html

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 06, 2002, 07:23 AM   #18
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

Friday, April 05, 2002
Copyright © Las Vegas Review-Journal


A Day in the Life
Paul McCartney talks about the Beatles, Linda and his impressive body of
work
By DOUG ELFMAN
REVIEW-JOURNAL

Paul McCartney visited George Harrison on his deathbed last November. It
had been nearly 38 years since the Beatles began defining pop music with
their first hit, "I Want to Hold Your Hand." In a way, their lives had
come full circle, as McCartney remembers their final, tender moment:

"What I hold onto is the fact that when I last saw him, we held hands for
a couple of hours. And you know, guys from Liverpool don't hold hands. So
I just look at that and think, 'Of course, it was mightily sad saying
goodbye to George, but I got to hold his hand.' And I concentrate on that
aspect of it, which makes me feel better."

Just a few years before, McCartney also had survived the death of his
wife, Linda. Now, with a new album out, "Driving Rain," and two concerts
set at the MGM Grand Garden arena this weekend, he talks of his legacy, of
stars who end up "believing their own myths" and remaining upbeat, even
though "life is tough."

Elfman: I was just reading about the first time you were here in '64, when
you were holed up in your room with slot machines.

McCartney: That's right. We couldn't get down to the casinos. But it was
great. It was a pity, really, that we never could enjoy Las Vegas, because
we were too sort of famous. It would have caused a riot. So we were in
this great town, but we couldn't go out and play.

Elfman: We've heard stories over the years about girls who said they were
partying with the band.

McCartney: (jokingly defensive) That wasn't me man. No, no, I deny
everything, officer. It was not me.

No, we had some fun, I must say. It was OK; we were young, single and
wild.

Elfman: Of all the people in the 20th century, you're one of the very few
who can think of yourself still being played 400 years from now. That's
sort of a musician's dream, I would think.

McCartney: It is great. We just feel very lucky. I think every aspect of
my career, I've been trying to, sort of, do well. I never got that feeling
like, "That's enough." And you know, I have done quite a lot of stuff.
I've just enjoyed it. That's the secret.

Elfman: Can you give me an example of some of the songs (that will be
played in concert)?

McCartney: Yeah, I mean, I'd probably want to hear "Maybe I'm Amazed." And
the stuff you wouldn't leave out, like, maybe "Let It Be" and "Hey Jude."
... And the list got longer and longer. I was trying to do about an
hour-and-a-half, but it ended up more like 2:15.

Elfman: When I was listening to the (latest) album, it seemed that there
were some obvious nods to Linda. But I didn't want to make that
assumption. Maybe "Lonely Road." Even the cover (of the liner notes) has
half of the Wings' hands (on it) I wasn't sure if that was intentional or
not.

McCartney: Well, that wasn't intentional. That's always been one of those
things; people read in stuff. But I don't mind people reading in stuff.
It's just the way it is. No, that wasn't intentional. But "Magic" was
about Linda, the song on the album, that was directly about her.

(Note: "Magic" starts: "There must have been magic the night that we met.
If I hadn't stopped you, I'd always regret. A few minutes later, you'd
have been out that door, and I'd have been lonely, forever more.")

Elfman: Do you have any songs that you just can't play anymore, not
necessarily having to do with Linda, but feelings you don't have anymore
for a song, or that are too painful to remember?

McCartney: No, I don't think so, you know. Um, no. There may be some that
get near that, but I generally, I kind of like the song for what it is. So
for instance, I'm doing "My Love" in the set, which was written for Linda.
But I remember that the audience takes it for themselves. I will always
see, like, a couple. A guy puts his arm around the girl and they snuggle
down, and I do "My Love." I remember I used to announce, "for all the
lovers in the audience." ...

I don't think there really is anything that's too painful, not that I can
think of. The stuff that is very emotional, I don't really mind that. I
quite like to get in touch with my emotions. Especially, now. I'm not like
an 18-year-old. I would have gotten embarrassed when I was 18. I don't get
embarrassed now.

Elfman: You have always seemed so even-keeled. That's a great trait.

McCartney: Oh, yeah. Well, you know, I came from a really cool family in
Liverpool. I go back up there now, and I'm like nothing amongst them. I'm
just one of the family. And they just treat me like, (raising his voice
for a joke) they treat me like dirt, man! They just treat me like Paul.
It's not like, "Our Paul!" It's not like, "Oh, the big famous guy's
arrived." And I just stand around, and I am just one of them. ...

When you come up in a family like that, it's kind of valuable to keep your
feet on the ground. It sort of helps you with yourself. You don't get too
crazy in your own head.

Elfman: I don't think that trait is in abundant supply, necessarily, among
superstars.

McCartney: No, it's true. I read an article the other day, and I was just
sort of, it seemed like the person was just so sort of horrible, just not
a nice person.

You know, I say I'm from the working class. I still say I'm a
working-class guy. That's how I want to feel. And I know, if you're really
sort of over-the-top and big-headed and mean to people, it's OK while
you're in the room, 'cause you're the boss, and you can do all that. But
the minute you leave the room, I know what people do: "Oh yeah, screw him.
What a jerk he was." And that's not particularly how I want people to
perceive me. I'd rather just get on with people.

Elfman: So what do you think about the evolution of your voice? I think
you're turning 60 this year, is that right?

McCartney: It can't be me. I was just saying, "Someone falsified my birth
certificate." I think I got framed, man. ...

I have actually got a CD that someone gave me for this tour of a, like, a
voice warm-up thing. But I just haven't listened to it, yet. I haven't
done any of that my whole career. I just assumed it'd be all right. And
you know, so far, so good.

Elfman: You've abused your vocal chords some. You used to smoke, didn't
you?

McCartney: I used to smoke? Yeah, I did used to smoke a lot. I used to
smoke Senior Service (cigarettes) without tips. Those were, like, the kind
of things sailors smoked, man. ... Those were like really butch. But, um,
luckily I gave those up quite a number of years ago. ... I wish I did
things (to protect the voice), but I don't do anything. I cross me
fingers. That's really what I do.

Elfman: What do you think the biggest mistake musicians make is?

McCartney: Musicians make? Um, believing their own myths, I think. ...
There are some musicians who don't make mistakes. Someone like Eric
Clapton, I don't spot him making too many mistakes.

But there are some people who just get too big for their own boots. The
one we talked about before? I think it's a very destructive thing. I don't
think it's good for you or yourself. It's certainly not good for the
people around you.

Elfman: What about when you hear music? You must think, "That's a mistake,
and that's a common mistake." Is there a common denominator, how people
could make better songs?

McCartney: I don't know, really. This is a bit of a difficult question.
... I tend to sort of listen to music, spot the good stuff, sort of ignore
the mistakes. And I just sort of think, "Wow, that's great." I'm a pretty
positive person, you know, and I do try to see the good in everything. It
just seems to me to be a good idea, because life is tough.

You know, I mean, my friend George just died. I saw him a couple of weeks
before he died. But what I hold onto is the fact that when I last saw him,
we held hands for a couple of hours. And you know, guys from Liverpool
don't hold hands. So I just look at that and think, "Of course, it was
mightily sad saying goodbye to George, but I got to hold his hand." And I
concentrate on that aspect of it, which makes me feel better.

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 11, 2002, 11:27 PM   #19
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

http://www.metromix.com/top/1,1419,M...-16145,00.html

Rock review, Paul McCartney at the United Center

By Greg Kot

On Wednesday, the 31st anniversary of the Beatles break-up, Paul McCartney held aloft a violin-shaped Hofner bass that made the years melt away.
Trouble has always rolled off McCartney's Teflon shoulders, and he made it all look easy as he cherry-picked songs, many of them classics, from five decades of recording in the first of two sold-out shows at the United Center.

He devoted more than half the concert-20 songs-to the Beatles, and he did not find room on the generous set list for "Silly Love Songs." Sometimes, life spoils us.


Paul McCartney at the United Center.
Tribune photo by Heather Stone.
Even skeptics had to be grinning themselves silly midway through the second song. McCartney rubbed some vinegar into "Jet," prodded by the ballistic tom-tom volleys of drummer Abe Laboriel Jr., one of four unknowns who backed the best left-handed bassist in rock history. The last time McCartney performed in concert with a band this good, he was playing the rooftop of Abbey Road studios with three pals from Liverpool.

Guitarists Rusty Anderson and Brian Ray were rough and rowdy at the right moments, and Paul "Wix" Wickens conjured the sound of strings and horns on his synthesizers, let his gospel organ roar, or added a tasteful dollop of accordion to McCartney's acoustic finger-picking. The sound through most of the hall was shockingly pristine-I've never heard a mix better at this acoustically challenged sports arena-and the modular video screens ringing the stage provided an attractive counterpoint to the show's essence: the music.

The master of ceremonies was a relaxed, affable presence, especially when offering a Rutles-like explanation for the origins of his reggae-tinged 1972 B-side, "C Moon." It was the most obscure of 36 songs he performed in a two-and-a-half hour concert, and one of only a handful that fell relatively flat amid the cavalcade of hits, which leaned heavily on his '60s and '70s catalogue.

He was in fine voice, making no concessions to his 59 years by singing even the most vocally challenging Beatles songs ("Hello, Goodbye") in their original high keys without much apparent strain. Though he fumbled a lyric here and there, it only served to demonstrate how he refuses to rely on such now-common props as pre-recorded backing tracks and special effects (there was only one series of gratuitous pyro explosions, during "Live and Let Die," which incongruously followed the Sept. 11 tribute "Freedom").

This was McCartney as the leader of a tight rock 'n' roll combo, eager recruits who performed some of the sturdiest pop songs of the last half-century. Nearly every dramatic opportunity was exploited: the crashing entrance of Ray's 12-string acoustic guitar during the final section of the "Band on the Run" suite, the radiant three-part harmonies on "Maybe I'm Amazed," the escalating fury of the drum and guitar solos that close off "The End."


McCartney alternated among bass, acoustic and electric guitars, grand piano and electric keyboard. He effectively deployed the band to create a variety of moods, from the rampaging "Jet" and "Back in the USSR" to contemplative, unplugged treatments of "Eleanor Rigby" and "Here, There and Everywhere."


A midconcert solo set found McCartney skipping some of the more difficult acoustic finger-picking on "Blackbird" and "Mother Nature's Son," and turning one of his finest, most complex compositions, "You Never Give Me Your Money," into a lounge piano ballad that would have been vastly improved by a full-blooded band treatment. But his tributes to John Lennon ("Here Today") and George Harrison ("Something," performed on ukulele, an instrument the late guitarist cherished) were enhanced by the intimacy.

McCartney offered credible versions of his most recent songs, culled from the "Driving Rain" album and the "Vanilla Sky" movie soundtrack. Of these, "Lonely Road" fared best with McCartney bursting into some gritty shouting during the fade. But in this blue-eyed soul vein he was even better on the slow-burn "Let Me Roll It" and the ring-down-Valhalla hymn "Let It Be."

There are few sights more joyous than McCartney clutching his Hofner and singing "I Saw Her Standing There," complete with scream, an echo of four long-ago mop-tops driving themselves and several continents into a frenzy.

The singer performed the dance tune, as he does just about everything, with a smile that radiated a nonjudgmental warmth. The words in most of the songs he performed shied from introspection, instead offering solace: "You can make it, stick with me"; "this is your time, this is your day, you've got it all, don't blow it away"; "take a sad song and make it better."

The backdrop for all this abundant goodwill was some of the priciest tickets in concert history, ranging as high as $268, including service fees. A concert program was $30, a T-shirt $35. It was a reflection of cold business reality, at odds with a performer who has spent most of his life writing songs designed to make that reality more bearable.

But businessman McCartney was nowhere to be found inside the arena. Even if he is no longer writing quality songs as consistently as he once did, he projects a charisma that charms and a potent musicality that continues to defy aging and command awe. To those who can afford him on this tour, McCartney is proving that he's still worth every cent.

Originally published on April 11, 2002.

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Old Apr 13, 2002, 03:17 AM   #20
Amalthea
Old Brown Shoe
 
Join Date: Sep 21, 2001
Posts: 3,911
Default Re: Driving USA Articles

...from Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

(no link, sorry)


McCartney keeps audience remembering that they're alive


By DAVE TIANEN
of the Journal Sentinel staff

Last Updated: April 11, 2002

Chicago - He even brought balloons.
Review
Photo/AP
Paul McCartney performs Wednesday at the United Center in Chicago, during his
Driving USA Tour.
Related Coverage

It was apparent Wednesday night at the United Center that Paul McCartney has
decided to lift the spirits of a nation.
The baby boomers in his audience probably were feeling a bit frayed even
before the recession and Sept. 11.
Increasingly conscious of their own aging, they've had to confront the loss
of old friends such as George Harrison and the nearing horizon of their own
mortality.
Who better to serve then as their official morale officer than Paul
McCartney? At 59, the cute Beatle has softened at the jawline, but there are
still vestiges of those boyish good looks. He remains trim, energetic and,
more importantly, cheerful, optimistic and - it's an odd adjective for a rock
superstar - friendly.
After all these years, it's clear the fans still see him first, second and
third as a Beatle.
The crowd at the first of two sold-out shows at the United Center was on its
feet for the first half-dozen songs in the set.
When McCartney finally got to "Lonely Road," a song from his new album,
"Driving Rain," they sat down. They still applauded politely, even warmly,
but it was obvious this was not what they came to hear.
It's interesting how McCartney deals with his illustrious past.
The Driving USA Tour deftly revisits the past but refuses to live in it.
There was a respectable sampling of new material: the new album's title
track, "Freedom" and "Your Loving Flame," plus his song for the film "Vanilla
Sky." There's also a swath of solo and Wings' material: "Jet," "Band on the
Run," "Maybe I'm Amazed" and "Live and Let Die."
Yet in the three-hour show there were lots of Beatles memories for the fans
to relive.
Some of them are the obvious monsters: "Yesterday," "Hey Jude," "Can't Buy Me
Love," "Lady Madonna," "I Saw Her Standing There." But there are lesser gems
as well: "Mother Nature's Son," "Carry That Weight," "Getting Better" "Back
in the U.S.S.R." and "The End."
Deploying those album tracks is a smart use of a huge catalog. They give the
tour something fresh and unexpected while still evoking the Beatles.
In many ways, Driving USA is a simply produced show (McCartney is backed by a
band of five younger players), but it does make lavish use of video on
multiple screens.
"Can't Buy Me Love" was accompanied by that frolic-in-the-park segment from
"Hard Day's Night," and for "All My Loving" they brought back footage of all
those little girls shrieking through chain-link fences at the Beatles'
arrival in America. If you're of a certain age, it's hard not to smile at the
memories of that long-ago hysteria.
Even the moments of sadness were handled with a touch of humor. McCartney's
old partner John Lennon was saluted with the self-effacing "Here Today."
And then he came to George. McCartney sang "Something." As a solo. With a
ukulele. It was a moment both affectionate and whimsical. You have to think a
gentle spirit such as George Harrison would have liked it a lot.
One of the likable things about McCartney is the way he coaxes an adoring
throng of 20,000 people to see him not as a rock icon but as a person and a
friend.
He dresses simply. Nothing theatrical: short-sleeved pullover and jeans. And
for a long segment in the middle of the show, it was just McCartney on stage
with an acoustic guitar, or with accordionist Wix Wickens. He chatted about
how he came to write "Blackbird" as a reaction to the American civil rights
struggle.
It was an extended passage of club-like intimacy in what figured to be a
superstar event.
At the end, he did something very clever.
Throughout the evening there had been big-screen color projections of the
star on stage, interspersed with black-and-white footage of his Beatles'
youth.
For "I Saw Her Standing There," the performing Paul was projected again, but
this time in black and white.
And there was still just enough boyish energy and good looks to connect the
man on stage with the fresh-faced kid who serenaded the world in 1964. You
could tell it was the same guy.
And in that moment, 20,000 people felt a little younger.


Appeared in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on April 12, 2002.

~~~~~~~~~~

------------------
"Because there wasn't any reason left to keep it all inside"
- Paul McCartney, 1982
Amalthea is offline  
Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Advertisements

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Site Features
Search Links

  Advanced Search
Category Jump



BeatleMail

FREE E-MAIL
@ BEATLEMAIL.COM


Username


Password




New User Sign-Up!
Lost Password?
Beatles History




Donate
The costs of running our database and discussion forum are steadily rising. Any help we receive is greatly appreciated. Click HERE for more information about donating to BeatleLinks.
Extras
» Chat Room
» Current News
» Monthly Contest
» Interviews Database
» Random Site
» Banner Exchange
» F.A.Q.
» Advertise
» Credits
» Legal
» Contact Us
Copyright © 2000-2019 BeatleLinks
All Rights Reserved