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Old Feb 11, 2011, 11:30 AM   #1
ronbeat
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Default "Come Together: The Business Wisdom of the Beatles" -Horrible!

When I got a review copy of "Come Together: The Business Wisdom of the Beatles" (out next month), I couldn't contain my laughter. The Beatles made as many business mistakes as they did triumphs. The book is basically is an advice/pep talk book for new bands wanting to "make it big". It reads like a bad Deepak Chopra "feel good" book that pats you on the back as tells you, "you must believe in yourselves..."

Then, as I read it, I found NUMEROUS errors. First error I spotted:

Quote:
This unlikely, magical pairing of George Martin and the Beatles seems lucky in retrospect, if not downright accidental. But it certainly was not. Brian Epstein's unflagging efforts made it inevitable that the Beatles and George Martin would have their mutual audition...And when you're looking to turn your talent and potential into something the market can digest - literally or figuratevly - you do well to keep in mind this Beatles mantra: there are no lucky breaks. (pg 36)


Meeting George Martin was totally accidental! They had already been turned down by EMI, and Epstein was having acetates of the Decca audition tapes made at HMV. The tech asked him if he'd contacted George Martin. (I believe this is the correct chains of events). Meeting George Martin was a total "lucky break". Another "lucky break": Ed Sullivan first became aware of the Beatles when he was at Heathrow airport in London, when the Beatles were returning from Sweden" in 1963. A far cry from the oft-quoted, "we decided that we wouldn't got to America until we had a number-one..."

Here's the second big error I spotted:

Quote:
At their first performance in the United States, in Washington, D.C., they played on a rotating stage surrounded on all sides by screaming fans. After several numbers, they realized that the rotating stage was not rotating - and the fans behind them had only seen their backs. The Beatles interrupted their set, and they turned the rotating stage themselves, using only Beatle elbow grease and almost wrenching their backs in the process. That's service. (pg 42)


The stage was NOT automated! And they did not "interrupt their set" - if you watch the footage, they do not do this in the middle of song!

And the biggest Beatles joke of the year goes to the advice,
Quote:
"channel your inner Allen Klein"! (p219)


This needs to be turned into an audio book, where the advice is narrated in a calm, soothing voice, with the gentle sounds of falling water and harps are played!
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Old Feb 12, 2011, 12:53 AM   #2
Badgirl66
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Book 1000000000 was MAN never needed

Wow Robeat 14 posting in 6 Years...

Last edited by Badgirl66 : Feb 12, 2011 at 12:54 AM.
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Old Feb 12, 2011, 06:41 AM   #3
ronbeat
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Wow Robeat 14 posting in 6 Years...
Ha ha...well, only talk when I have something to say!
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Old Mar 20, 2011, 02:51 PM   #4
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There's an article about the book in today's (Sunday, March 20, 2011) NY Times business section:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/20/bu...l?ref=business

March 19, 2011
Whisper Words of Business Wisdom
By AMY WALLACE

THE Beatles were stymied. During a 1968 recording session, they couldn’t find a suitable introduction to “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da,” a song written by Paul McCartney. John Lennon didn’t much like the song, and, after several hours, he stormed out of the studio. When he returned, he strode to the piano and banged out several chords, then added petulantly, “Here’s your intro!”

“All eyes shifted to Paul, expecting rejection, perhaps an outburst,” according to a new book, “Come Together: The Business Wisdom of The Beatles.” (Turner Publishing, $24.95). Instead, McCartney defused the tension with this: “That’s quite good, actually.” Lennon’s chords, pounded out in a fit of pique, make up the song’s now-famous opening.

“The underlying disagreement about whether the song had merit in the broader scheme of things did not disappear,” the book concludes, “but resolving the conflict informed the work and made it stronger, rather than destroying it.”

That takeaway — that disagreement can lead to synthesis — is just one of 100 lessons that the book teases out of the history of the Fab Four.

The book’s authors, Richard Courtney and George Cassidy, acknowledge that it is built around a gimmicky idea: treating the Beatles’ successes and failures as a sort of Rosetta Stone not just for aspiring rock stars, but also for businesspeople everywhere. Such a premise is sure to earn some flak from certain Beatles fans who “don’t feel that the Beatles and business are topics that mix comfortably,” Mr. Cassidy says.

“There were some very visible failures, particularly in the late ’60s, centered around the Apple group of companies,” he says, referring to the various enterprises the Beatles started at the time to enter the film, record and retail businesses. “For a lot of people that became the whole story as far as the Beatles and business are concerned. Our approach was to take a look at a longer trend line, a bigger set of facts, and say by and large this thing has been ticking upwards for almost 50 years now.”

It’s an intriguing idea — that by studying creative people who are passionate about what they do, we can enhance our own creativity, and business savvy, even if we work in a completely different arena.

Of course, it’s easier for most people to relate to musicians and their work than, say, to people who design furniture (and their end tables). The obvious emotion underlying a great song makes us feel that we have at least some understanding of the performers and their motivations. The authors of “Come Together,” both Nashville residents and avid Beatles fans, make the most of that idea: that in the beginning at least, the Beatles were just like you and me.

For example, when the Beatles were a young band, their only means of transportation was a van missing its windshield. That meant that in the dead of winter, traveling across England to a gig was such a frigid experience that the band members who weren’t driving huddled on top of one another for warmth, the authors write, adding: “Take a page out of their book. Although frostbite is generally a bad idea, avoid relying heavily on debt to finance your daily operations or growth.”

THE Lennon-McCartney decision to always share credit on songs provided another lesson, the authors suggest: Don’t waste time arguing over crumbs when that energy could be better used building a bakery — or, in this case, the Beatles songbook.

Another story from the Beatles’ early years highlights the importance of heeding feedback, even when it’s not what you want to hear. Executives at Capitol Records, the American affiliate of EMI, took a pass on “Love Me Do.” Even after the success of “Please, Please Me” — a No. 1 album in Britain — Capitol refused to issue the record or any of its singles.

The Beatles could have kept arguing about the album’s merits, or simply given up on conquering America. Instead, Mr. Courtney and Mr. Cassidy explain, they kept recording new material and sending it to Capitol — for one solid year. Finally, in 1964, Capitol released “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” which became the Beatles’ first No. 1 hit in the United States.

“The most important lesson here is not simple perseverance, though that is important,” the book says. “The approach was key. They did not continue to pitch Capitol the same product that they had already rejected.” Instead, the Beatles’ producer George Martin got in touch only “when he had something new and improved.”

In the book, Mr. Courtney and Mr. Cassidy tell a story about how one night Lennon and McCartney taught Mick Jagger and Keith Richards how to write their own songs — by composing “I Wanna Be Your Man” in front of them. The anecdote raises the question: Is there a book to be written about the business wisdom of the Rolling Stones?

Mr. Courtney, a Realtor and real estate columnist who has read every book ever written about the Beatles, said a Stones project would require much new research. But Mr. Cassidy, a longtime business journalist and sometimes sound engineer, seemed intrigued.

“The Stones have stayed together as a working band for so long and weathered so many changes in the music business,” he said. “They weathered the decline of record sales and the increased emphasis on live performance and touring as a revenue source. They also adopted a number of strategies very different from the Beatles — becoming expatriates to avoid the crushing British tax burden. It’s a very different story but almost an equally fascinating one.”

In other words, if “Come Together” does well, “Gimme (Tax) Shelter” may not be far behind.
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Old Mar 21, 2011, 03:51 PM   #5
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If you read Bob Spitz's book, (pg 301) there is an interesting description of the first meeting of Epstein and George Martin and how desperately Epstein tried to sell George Martin on the Beatles. George Martin was far from bowled over by the Decca tapes, but did half heartedly offer an audition at the end of a very hard sell by Epstein.
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Old Mar 22, 2011, 03:32 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronbeat View Post
When I got a review copy of "Come Together: The Business Wisdom of the Beatles" (out next month), I couldn't contain my laughter. The Beatles made as many business mistakes as they did triumphs.....This needs to be turned into an audio book, where the advice is narrated in a calm, soothing voice, with the gentle sounds of falling water and harps are played!
I laughed out loud when I read your review of this book as my initial reaction upon first hearing about it was the same....the Beatles had precious little "business wisdom" - hello, remember a little fiasco called Apple?! Thanks for taking the time to point out the numerous errors - sort of reminds me of the Spitz book....a reference , mayhaps?
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Old Mar 28, 2011, 05:19 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Terri287 View Post
I laughed out loud when I read your review of this book as my initial reaction upon first hearing about it was the same....the Beatles had precious little "business wisdom" - hello, remember a little fiasco called Apple?! Thanks for taking the time to point out the numerous errors - sort of reminds me of the Spitz book....a reference , mayhaps?
Oh, found another one...regarding MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR. In the book it says (page 183), "It is interesting to consider whether Epstein would have approved of such a project."
Well, in the book, "Many Years From Now" (p351), it is shown that Brian DID know of the project and talked about it in some detail with Paul!

For so-called Beatles experts, the authors simply seem to "bend" history to sell a half-assed "how to make your band succeed" book!
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