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Old Dec 22, 2011, 09:33 PM   #41
Apple Scruff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LetThereBeMusic View Post
S'pose that's why I wasn't really suggesting them =P
adding to the books John read.

Also- I think the Jabberwocky poem is actually in 'Alice'... I've read it, but I haven't read 'Alice' in a really long time...
Well there you go.
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Old Dec 22, 2011, 09:36 PM   #42
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I believe you can buy it here-
http://www.google.com/products/catal...ed=0CGIQ8wIwAA

the prices vary, though. $2-$13.
never ordered from that place, though.
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Old Dec 22, 2011, 09:47 PM   #43
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Thank you so much!!!
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Old Dec 22, 2011, 10:12 PM   #44
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Default Curiosities of Natural History by Francis T Buckland

There's not many books that can make Alice in Wonderland seem almost staid but Curiosities of Natural History, by Francis T Buckland,
first published 1857, does the trick. Hovering somewhere between the macabre and the hilarious, it's Victorian 'scientific knowledge' at its finest.
Or how about topics such as "A queer mode of dislodging a Newt from a Man's Stomach" or "Horace's description of a Rat's Feast"? He covers
everything from fleas to monster pigs and mermaids. Three-legged horses and earless cats also abound, depending on what edition is consulted.

The books start like this:

Quote:
The Preface is generally the last portion of a book which is written and on this account it ought to be read first.
I would beg of those into whose hands this book should come to reverse the usual order of things and to read the Preface
before they dip into the contents. They will then know why it was written.
One of the illustrations:



Many editions were printed so we don't quite know which one John owned.There has been some modern
reprints but not certain whether they contain any of the drawings, which are a must.

This book got to be seen to be believed! Here's the 1865 and 1868 editions as etexts. This is education as its funniest!



* Sorry for the size of the image.
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Old Dec 22, 2011, 10:15 PM   #45
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Would it be insensitive to post The Catcher in the Rye?...Sorry I know, bad question. But I enjoyed that book and it's too bad it was misused.

As a winner of the Nobel Prize in liturature, I would recommend those Churchill WWII books, nothing better than hearing it straight from someone who was on the sidelines the whole time. Didn't he read Don Quixote? Also a good one.
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Old Dec 22, 2011, 10:18 PM   #46
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Scruff- it was quite literally nothing xD

Ohmygoodness I LOVED 'Catcher in the Rye'...

I felt almost bad that I enjoyed it. and it was used for such evil purposes.
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Old Dec 22, 2011, 10:24 PM   #47
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I'd say any book that John read, however controversial, is fair game!
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Old Dec 23, 2011, 06:00 AM   #48
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Default If anyone has avoided "Catcher in the Rye" ....

because some bag of useless lard used it to justify his heinous act, that is really unfortunate. Lardass committed a crime against art, literature, and humanity.

I resent that guy on so many levels. What is a wonderful, funny, sad, sensitive book about navigating adolescence has been overshadowed by John's murder. I unfortunately did not read that book until after the fact, and so I was never able to read it and appreciate it on its own merits without the fact of John's murder hovering over it like Banquo's ghost, nor can anyone, now.

That was a crime against "Catcher" and its creator, JD Salinger, and generations of future readers as well.

I don't know what it's like for new generations of Beatle and John fans to discover the music now; but I know they've been robbed of a certain innocence and forced to bear the burden of tragedy. I imagine it's akin to my experience of "Catcher."

McGee's crime was so evil on so many levels.

<end rant>

Hell yes, bring on "Catcher!"

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Old Dec 23, 2011, 09:11 AM   #49
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Catcher in the Rye and On the Road were two classics of modern American lit that John loved and related to. And they're two of my all-time faves. We have to reclaim Catcher in the Rye so that it doesn't have any trace back to that degenerate. wilde, you're a New Yorkophile... that is a great book for anyone who loves New York!

Okay, how about this 1972 publicatio, which I suppose needs little explanation:



Here's the blurb: This updated edition of the classic mind training exercises that became the bible of consciousness exploration for a generation extends the usefulness of the "games" into corporate, educational, therapeutic, and community settings. A set of "Applications" for each cycle of games gives clear instructions for their use by teachers, therapists, workshop leaders, corporate trainers, church and community leaders, and everyone interested in maximizing their potential for: problem solving, team building,and conflict resolution; increased concentration and productivity; creativity and visionary thinking; stress reduction and relaxation; focused listening and super communication. Group facilitators and everyone who wants to live and work with more focus, flow, and mental flexibility will love this valuable resource.
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Old Dec 23, 2011, 10:11 AM   #50
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Default Brave New World by Aldous Huxley



This was apparently one of the books in John's large library of books. It's a literary classic and quote an astonishing read about the "future" and the present. I think it's incredible and resonates deeply with the reality.

A synopsis:

Quote:
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is a classic science fiction work that continues to be a significant warning to our society today. Tony Britton, the reader, does an excellent job of portraying clinical detachment as the true nature of the human incubators is revealed. The tone lightens during the vacation to the wilderness and the contrast is even more striking. Each character is given a separate personality by Britton's voices. As the story moves from clinical detachment to the human interest of Bernard, the nonconformist, and John, the "Savage," listeners are drawn more deeply into the plot. Finally, the reasoned tones of the Controller explain away all of John's arguments against the civilization, leading to John's death as he cannot reconcile his beliefs to theirs.
You can buy this book on Amazon for an assortment of prices and conditions.
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Old Dec 23, 2011, 10:17 AM   #51
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^ Oh man!!! You all are coming up with some amazing books!!!
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Old Dec 24, 2011, 02:39 PM   #52
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I'm going to do this book club for my girl Wilde but what I want to know is where is my Oscar Wilde thread? I want some pictures of Bosy in some fancy clothes and lots of top hats and I have been waiting patiently w/my clIff notes. I may not be a literary scholar but I can definitely contribute my thoughts.
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Old Jan 08, 2012, 03:36 PM   #53
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Default Forty-One Years In India by Field Marshal Lord Roberts

John had a truly eclectic taste and another book that's known he had and supposedly enjoyed is
Forty-One Years In India by Field Marshal Lord Roberts. How far from Huxley is that?



From the preface:

Quote:
I send out this book in the earnest hope that the friendly anticipations
of those who advised me to write it may not be seriously disappointed;
and that those who care to read a plain, unvarnished tale of Indian life
and adventure, will bear in mind that the writer is a soldier, not a man
of letters, and will therefore forgive all faults of style or language.
The complete text is available online here for anyone interested.
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Old Jan 08, 2012, 04:34 PM   #54
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Yes, eclectic is only one of the adjectives that describes our Johnny...

On a book-related note, I found this quote from John from a 1975 Rolling Stone interview.

Quote:
Q: Do you think much of yourself as an artist at fifty or sixty?

John: I never see meself as not an artist. I never let meself believe that an artist can run dry. I've always had this vision of bein' sixty and writing children's books. I don't know why. It'd be a strange thing for a person who doesn't really have much to do with children. I've always had that feeling of giving what Wind in the Willows and Alice in Wonderland and Treasure Island gave to me at age seven and eight. The books that really opened my whole being.
Damn! Could you imagine the brilliant children's books he could have written??? (I would have made them required reading for all students at my school! )
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Old Jan 08, 2012, 05:02 PM   #55
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That quote from John is heartbreaking. I swear to you all...I have never hated a person I didn't know so passionately as I hate the demon who killed John (and Hitler and a few others). I mean...do you get me?
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Old Jan 10, 2012, 01:02 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple Scruff View Post
That quote from John is heartbreaking. I swear to you all...I have never hated a person I didn't know so passionately as I hate the demons who killed John (and Hitler and a few others). I mean...do you get me?
Yeah, I get you Scruffie; it's just frustrating if you think about...

As a child, I was very impressed when I listened to the record "Alice in Wonderland" and read the illustrated book; I found it weird and even a bit scary, but also very fascinating. Though, it wasn't my favourite, it was and always remained a classic to me

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Old Jan 13, 2012, 07:55 AM   #57
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If you think about it, both John and 'Alice In Wonderland' are remarkably similar. They both leave their audiences grinning like a Cheshire cat!

I adore 'The Wind in the Willows' and 'Treasure Island' too. Real classics of children's literature.

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Old Jan 14, 2012, 08:17 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nowhere Anne View Post
If you think about it, both John and 'Alice In Wonderland' are remarkably similar. They both leave their audiences grinning like a Cheshire cat!

I adore 'The Wind in the Willows' and 'Treasure Island' too. Real classics of children's literature.
Yeah, you are right about the Cheshire cat, Nowhere Anne

"Treasure Island" is a real classic; I like it too.

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Old Jan 16, 2012, 06:16 AM   #59
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Default Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray"



I was listening to the Imagine album this past weekend (what a damn work of art) and I kept thinking about this book thread that I haven't posted in because I'm not as scholarly as some of you b*tches. Well, low and behold, Crippled Inside starts playing and I remember one of the few books I actually read on my book list in junior high. I think this may have been Oscar Wilde's only published novel, but don't ask me- direct any questions to wildewoman.

Anyway, what struck me in the lyrics of Crippled Inside (which I don't think was written with PAUL in mind at all- John had other people he thought about and I personally think he could have just been singing in general or even about his fine self) is that they run parallele to the underlying theme of this book. There's this dude who is obsessed with his physical appearance, but he's a nasty @**hole and the mirror starts showing his decaying soul/inner person.

And the lyrics in Crippled Inside are:

"You can shine your shoes and wear a suit
You can comb your hair and look quite cute
You can hide your face behind a smile
One thing you can't hide
Is when you're crippled inside"


So I really think that John may have read this book and got the dark, deep theme of it. And he thought about it in life as a whole. You know, maybe some of his own f***-ups, maybe people he knew, maybe people in general.

I really do hope that we start this book club at some point in February! I have a little time off during the middle of the month and I can put the ipad to good use.

Who's in charge? I assume either Apple Scruff, hibgal, wildewoman, or Maia. Well, listen up ladies: I would truly appreciate it if you would not assign something very complex or long for the first month. Go easy on me. The only reading I do is either word-related or children's books. I need something a little in between.

Thank you kindly.
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Old Jan 23, 2012, 10:00 PM   #60
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Fly, what an excellent write-up! I don't know where wilde is... We miss her! I hope she reads what you wrote. Oscar Wilde was the Man.
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