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Old Aug 12, 2011, 11:41 AM   #121
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Adri the taxgirl and I are gonna try to get to the premiere, but why San Sabastian of all places
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Old Aug 24, 2011, 08:37 PM   #122
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How does one get tickets for such a thing? I've visited the web site of the film festival, but I cannot see any link like "Buy tickets", or something like that. San Sebastian, without being extremely convenient for me, is moderately so, and since I don't have much confidence in their showing this film in the cinemas (if they do, it'll be because, afeter all, it's Scorsese's), I'd like to see the premiere.
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Old Aug 25, 2011, 12:22 AM   #123
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Well since the moderator here takes no action about this big thing;

I have contacted the San Sebastian organisation and they will release their program on September 10 and then also tickets will be available. It's odd that a festival like this does not release it earlier.

I have also contacted Dhani Harrison who may respond about some details.

For now, the premiere will be between 16 and 24 of September and we are gonna be there. I look so much forward to this.
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Old Aug 25, 2011, 11:11 AM   #124
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Thanks for sharing the info! Unluckily, on the 10th I will be returning home from a trip, so maybe by the time I can check it, all the tickets are gone. But I'll try. I'm going to take my summer holidays from the 16th to the 25th of September, so I might be able to go, no matter what day. Let's see what happens.
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Old Aug 25, 2011, 12:05 PM   #125
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During the making of "The Beatles Anthology," George Harrison told his wife Olivia, "One day, I'll do my own Anthology," reports a preview of the film in the new issue of Rolling Stone dated Sept. 1.

That idea will come to life as "George Harrison: Living in the Material World," the three-hour plus documentary directed by Martin Scorsese that will premiere on HBO Oct. 5 and 6. The film will be accompanied by a book. Details of a DVD release in the U.S. haven't been revealed, though the UK DVD will be released in October.

The film isn't all sweetness and light. "He never said he was a saint, but he always said he was a sinner," Olivia Harrison told Rolling Stone. "He wanted to do everything in life. He really did."

The film will be screened at the San Sebastian and New York film festivals prior to its HBO premiere.

http://www.examiner.com/beatles-in-n...onal-anthology
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Old Aug 26, 2011, 09:05 AM   #126
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Is there a list of places where it will be showing.

To date I have not found a list of places where it will be shown, but then again it may be too soon.
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Old Aug 27, 2011, 09:47 AM   #127
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Is there a list of places where it will be showing.

To date I have not found a list of places where it will be shown, but then again it may be too soon.
Yeah, if you google search premiere of the doc, it will come up with heaps of links to the Official Premiere which the Harrison's have (very kindly!) set to be with HBO. So, it's not like the premiere will be in theaters or something like that.

There has been some discussion of the documentary being screened... and there are only three events of that nature that I know of: the pre-screening, this Spain film festival showing coming up, and a New York film festival coming up.

My friend saw a pre-screening of the movie. She said it was wonderful. That event was here in LA, but not open to the public.

What is being talking about in Spain is a showing at a Film Festival. Like how Cannes Film Festival each year gets goodies in advance. They got Paul's "Rupert and the Frog Song" AND "Seaside Woman" animations there, years ago, before any of us saw it. :) It's a film festival thing to do.

So there are only two film festivals showing George's doc. The second one is in New York, at the New York Film Festival. The New York one is on Tuesday Oct 4th, at 6:30pm. Tickets are available soon, at this link....

http://www.filmlinc.com/films/on-sal...material-world

BUT... that is really only one day ahead of when it screens on HBO. Unless people are already in New York, it seems prohibitive and not much incentive to fly in ($$).

Here is the Official Word....

New York — HBO has acquired the North American broadcast rights to Martin Scorsese's GEORGE HARRISON: LIVING IN THE MATERIAL WORLD, which will debut in two parts — on October 5 and October 6, 2011 — exclusively on HBO.

London — Lionsgate Home Entertainment UK announced that it will be releasing the film in the UK on 10th October 2011 in three editions – DVD, Blu-ray and DVD Double play (DVD/ BD combi pack), and a beautifully packaged DVD / Blu-Ray Deluxe Edition, which includes an exclusive CD of previously unheard tracks from George Harrison, and a book of photography to accompany the film.



http://www.georgeharrison.com/#/news...book-announced


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Old Aug 27, 2011, 04:06 PM   #128
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I can't wait! And when it comes out on dvd, I plan to get it!

Thank you so much!
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Old Sep 10, 2011, 01:00 PM   #129
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Rather than starting a new thread each time I find an article on the doc, I'll put this here:

The quiet beatle speaks

http://www.independent.ie/entertainm...s-2872636.html

They called him the 'Quiet' Beatle, but most fans have always known there was far more to George Harrison than his exterior of sultry silence. Perhaps that's down to tales of his wild behaviour, from his deportation during The Beatles' early days in Hamburg to more recently reported tales of his womanising, which have given the lie to any good-as-gold illusions.

Or perhaps, more likely, it's because people of such intellect, and of such creativity, are never quite as straightforward as George came across.

Either way, a new documentary directed by Martin Scorsese is to tap into one of the most intriguing aspects of the greatest band of all time -- and possibly unravel some of the mystery surrounding the man.

George Harrison: Living in the Material World is due for release next month and features interviews with some of the most important people from the musician's life -- including widow Olivia and son Dhani, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, George Martin, Yoko Ono and Phil Spector.

Olivia's role as co-producer allowed for a level of access unprecedented among the countless documentaries and books produced since George succumbed to cancer nearly 10 years ago in November 2001 -- and when it comes to tying it all together into a neat narrative, few are better suited to the task than this man at the helm.

Scorsese is no stranger to music. In 1976, impressed by the use of soundtrack on Mean Streets three years earlier, Robbie Roberston recruited the rising star to shoot The Band's farewell gig in San Francisco.

What started off as a simple documentation of the concert grew into a meticulously designed work of art, shot by a camera crew made up of the industry's best cinematographers, and The Last Waltz is now regarded as one of the finest-ever meetings of music and celluloid.

He has also produced an extensive series on the blues for US TV, and directed the lauded Bob Dylan documentary No Direction Home (2005) and The Rolling Stones concert film Shine A Light (2008).

But Scorsese's involvement is not the main reason why this movie is a must-see. Earlier this week, Olivia Harrison and Paul McCartney threw out a few hints regarding the juicier details of the film -- most notably that, in stark contrast to the calm image that descended upon George as he became ever-more enraptured by Eastern influences, his womanising ways continued right into his second marriage.

Following what she describes as 'hiccups' in their marriage, Olivia concedes: "He did like women and women did like him. If he just said a couple of words to you it would have a profound effect. So it was hard to deal with someone who was so well loved."

McCartney, somewhat more euphemistically, says that George "liked the things that men like. He was red-blooded".

Eric Clapton fell in love with Harrison's first wife, Pattie Boyd. He became involved with her while the pair were still married, but admits that even before that, "there was a lot of swapping and fooling around".

How far George had come from the 17-year-old who described Hamburg as "the naughtiest city in the world" following one the band's first stints there.

Often seen as a kid by the other, older members of the band -- not helped when he was deported from Germany for being underage -- it was for this reason that he often opted to keep his head down and prove himself as an able guitarist, which led to his later 'quiet' image.

In 1963, 'Don't Bother Me' became the first of George's songs to appear on a Beatles album, marking the point where he slowly began to come into his own as an artist. He wasn't an excellent singer, boasting a very ordinary voice when placed against the grittiness of John's or the beautiful clarity of Paul's -- but that mattered little when he was playing guitar like he was.

His influence on the band extended far beyond the studio. When he introduced the band to Eastern influences -- most notably to the transcendental meditation guru Maharishi Mahesh Yogi -- he provided a catalyst in the group's ongoing evolution from boyband to spearheads of the cultural revolution.

In 1968, Harrison became the first Beatle to issue a solo album; the Eastern-influenced soundtrack to the feature film Wonderwall was no great success, but it certainly marked out George's intentions, and signalled his growing restlessness within the band.

That didn't stop him, however, from producing material to rival the two bandmates in whose shadow he resided.

The likes of 'Think For Yourself' and 'While My Guitar Gently Weeps' (on which Clapton played the lead guitar) showed a songwriter who improved with every number he wrote -- and Abbey Road's 'Something' went on to be the second-most covered Beatles song after 'Yesterday'.

That still didn't make it any less surprising when, following the band's split in 1970, first blood went to Harrison in the quest for solo success. On the singles charts, Harrison's 'My Sweet Lord' spent the first of its two stints at number one (the second came after his death in 2001), and the superb triple-album All Things Must Pass was certified platinum six times over.

With The Concert for Bangladesh in 1971, Harrison developed the template for the global-scale celebrity-driven benefit gig -- however, after the success of Living In The Material World two years later, with its lead single 'Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)', Harrison's hippy star began to fade against the backdrop of a more cynical decade.

But Thirty Three & 1/3 and George Harrison (1976 and 1979) were strong releases, the latter featuring a stripped-back version of 'Not Guilty' -- a song that had been written for the White Album but was, along with 'Hey Jude', omitted from the final cut.

A stint with the supergroup Travelling Wilburys, alongside Jeff Lynne, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan and Roy Orbison, ensured that Harrison never strayed far from the public eye -- as did his 1987 surprise hit with a cover of Rudy Clark's 'I've Got My Mind Set On You'.

Scorsese's documentary will be a must-watch for anyone transfixed by this man, who managed to preserve an air of mystery even alongside the most stratospheric levels of fame. The Quiet Beatle, it seems, is finally about to speak.
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Old Sep 10, 2011, 01:01 PM   #130
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George Harrison Memorabilia To Go On Show

http://www.contactmusic.com/news/geo...n-show_1244401

Guitars, clothing and lyrics from George Harrison's collection are to be exhibited in Los Angeles to coincide with the release of Martin Scorsese's new film about the late Beatle.

The Grammy Museum in Los Angeles will mount a major exhibition on the life and music of Harrison next month (Oct11), titled George Harrison: Living in the Material World - which is also the name of Scorsese's film.

The museum is working closely with Harrison’s widow, Olivia Harrison and his son Dhani, in putting together what is being described as the first major look at Harrison, according to the Los Angeles Times.

The exhibition, which opens on 11 October (11), features memorabilia from Harrison's years with the Beatles, his solo career and the time he spent as a member of supergroup the Traveling Wilburys.

The show will also feature never-before-seen photographs taken by Harrison.
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Old Sep 12, 2011, 06:53 AM   #131
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George Harrison Memorabilia To Go On Show

http://www.contactmusic.com/news/geo...n-show_1244401

Guitars, clothing and lyrics from George Harrison's collection are to be exhibited in Los Angeles to coincide with the release of Martin Scorsese's new film about the late Beatle.

The Grammy Museum in Los Angeles will mount a major exhibition on the life and music of Harrison next month (Oct11), titled George Harrison: Living in the Material World - which is also the name of Scorsese's film.

The museum is working closely with Harrison’s widow, Olivia Harrison and his son Dhani, in putting together what is being described as the first major look at Harrison, according to the Los Angeles Times.

The exhibition, which opens on 11 October (11), features memorabilia from Harrison's years with the Beatles, his solo career and the time he spent as a member of supergroup the Traveling Wilburys.

The show will also feature never-before-seen photographs taken by Harrison.
Thanks for posting this. This seems quite interesting and I hope it will go to other places as well hopefully in Europe.

Unfortunetly most people here focus on George's media + Links girlies suggested life with women which also shows there were no replies to your last two posts.
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Old Sep 21, 2011, 03:28 AM   #132
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Thanks for posting this. This seems quite interesting and I hope it will go to other places as well hopefully in Europe.

Unfortunetly most people here focus on George's media + Links girlies suggested life with women which also shows there were no replies to your last two posts.
FP why must almost every post you post these days be negative and complaining about people in the forum?

You will post about an issue and instead of just doing that you weave in some sarcastic comment about "the girlies" or something, when it really is not called for. Even when the ladies ARENT talking about George and women or his looks or hair YOU point it out, perhaps even more than they talk about it these days..

Just saying..
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Old Sep 21, 2011, 10:14 AM   #133
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FP why must almost every post you post these days be negative and complaining about people in the forum?

You will post about an issue and instead of just doing that you weave in some sarcastic comment about "the girlies" or something, when it really is not called for. Even when the ladies ARENT talking about George and women or his looks or hair YOU point it out, perhaps even more than they talk about it these days..

Just saying..
Well said, CWW. Thank you!

We have some cool Californians here at Links, many of whom reside in the LA area or within traveling distance of LA. If anybody is going to that George Harrison exhibit, PLEASE take pictures and please share your observations!
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Old Sep 21, 2011, 10:10 PM   #134
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We have some cool Californians here at Links, many of whom reside in the LA area or within traveling distance of LA. If anybody is going to that George Harrison exhibit, PLEASE take pictures and please share your observations!
I will be going for sure! I'll be going (repeatedly!) and will bring back all the news! :)
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Old Sep 22, 2011, 09:58 AM   #135
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Wonderful! I hope you will take pictures.
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Old Sep 23, 2011, 06:40 AM   #136
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George Harrison - Something in the way he moved us

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-en...s-2359175.html

It is a happy thought that the sweetest music arises from an untroubled heart. As though from the sky, here is this strong and contented virtuoso – George Harrison, say – whom we envy for being strong, someone supremely contented. What a lucky man to be able to create such harmony and to penetrate our soul; to make us feel better, to help heal us and ease our minds. Isn't it pretty to think so?

The truth is usually the opposite of this. The art that is indestructible and always fresh never comes easy. Its source is typically uncertain or bleak, sometimes harrowing, the pure notes quavering over an abyss of shadows between life and death, that mournful place from which the most passionate yearnings take shape in the form of a song, a poem, a story, a harmonious vision. But even as I write this, speaking of the complex process of creation, words and music made of doubt and the divided self, the conflicts that help us to be sane, and the paradox of opposites, I seem to hear someone mutter over my shoulder, "Rock music is about as metaphysical as my Aunt Fanny..."

And yet it seems to me impossible to overestimate the resonant clarity of George Harrison's music – his songs of innocence and experience; or the subtle wisdom of his lyrics. Even as a relative youngster, more than 30 years before his untimely death, in his All Things Must Pass album, he was singing powerfully of transformation, in the title track, and "Art of Dying," and "Beware of Darkness," and "What is Life." He could be as jolly as his ukulele-strumming hero and namesake, George Formby, but as soon as he seizes our attention with his humour and his teasing, he is reminding us – and himself – that we are mortal and all things end.

George at his best was a man dedicated to whittling down his ego; he was not one being but many and he remains an enduring figure of fascination to those of us for whom his music runs through our head, reminding us of better times. It is no wonder he was so passionate: he was himself his own wicked twin. He made no bones about this and, a hater of pomposity in all forms, he expressed it with characteristic downright-ness:

"I have this kind of strange thing," he said, "and I put it down to being a Pisces. Pisces is the sign of two fish. The way I see it is that one half is going where the other half has just been. I was in the West and I was into rock'n'roll, getting crazy, staying up all night and doing whatever was supposed to be the wrong things. That's in conflict with all the right things, which is what I learned through India – like getting up early, going to bed early, taking care of yourself and having some sort of spiritual quality to your life. I've always had this conflict."

He was at odds with himself, but who isn't? In that respect "living proof of all life's contradictions," as he put it, he resembles most of us. We recognise him as a kindred soul in his contradictions – and though his life was lived on a vast scale, he was unusually truthful, and in his songs much more explicit than we dare to be. He made it his mission to explore his contradictions in his own way, through his music. So, to say that he was one of the great musicians of his time –one of the most innovative guitarists ever, most imaginative songwriters – is to give only part of the story. "The quiet one," is the stereotypical description of the man – but he was on fire within. To make music that mattered over the years, to bring renewal with each work, he seemed determined to burn out one self after another.

"He had karma to work out," his widow, Olivia, is on the record as saying. "He wasn't going come back and be bad. He was going to be good and bad and loving and angry and everything all at once. You know, if someone said to you, 'okay, you can go through your life and you can have everything in five lifetimes, or you can have a really intense one and have it in one, and then you can go and be liberated,' he would have said, 'give me the one, I'm not coming back here.'"

I also think there's a stark difference between "contradiction" and "confusion". He wasn't confused; had he been he would have found it impossible to search and learn with such clear-sightedness. His friend and mentor Ravi Shankar said that George exhibited tyagi, a Sanskrit term for a feeling of non-attachment or renunciation. Shankar wondered how this aspect of enlightenment could have come so clearly to a worldly lad from Liverpool. It doesn't seem odd to me that this thoughtful man came to feel the sense of freedom bordering on exaltation that mendicants experience in non-attachment. But it is a notable, and noble, quality in a rock star to practice it, as George did.

We all feel that we could do a bit better in our lives; in the secret history of this imaginative soul, George was active in pursuing this path. Surely it arose in large part from his having had everything while still young. At 19 or 20 he was on top of the world – inspiring the world to sing and dance. Performing with The Beatles gave him joy – gave us all joy. But he did not see this exuberance as a final fulfilment; the very fact of The Beatles as a musical and financial phenomenon made him doubtful enough to begin to look for a higher meaning, and – after The Beatles – to go on looking. He knew he was living in the material world, but had he been so attached to it he would not have been able to look deeper into it.

Early in his life as a musician, towards the end of the explosive new sound of The Beatles (and much more than music, it was a seismic shift in popular culture), George found his way to India. Through music and meditation, and the mantras that he chanted until the very end of his life, he was drawn to an unselfish, and ultimately a more mystical view of the world. The man who could make a whole stadium rock began to see silence as another ideal. He has described himself as an idle, smirking, doodling student at school, and yet in India he became devout and studious, a reader of the swamis – and notably, of Swami Vivekananda.

What has become apparent in the decade since his death is the uncanny symmetry of George's life – a life lived to the fullest. What might have seemed random or impulsive in him while he lived, is, in retrospect, a pattern, part performance, part pilgrimage.

His saturation in the material world drove him to seek the spirit in things – and so his life seems a series of vanishings and reappearances, journeys there and back, and even the portraits of him that seem iconic are various, a progression of so many faces, his features, his hair, his posture – different in each one. Yet his gaze is unchanged, his eyes telling us that the same soul is inhabiting this body.

All this sounds solemn, but he was a man of subtle and often self-mocking humour. George was interested in many things beside music, and although music was his first love, he was vitalised by travel, movie-making, and car racing. Look at his friends – the Pythons Gilliam and Idle, Jackie Stewart, Billy Preston, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Ravi Shankar: the funniest men on Earth, the fastest, his most brilliant contemporaries in music.

But equal to his passion for music, and his diverse and close friendships, was an overwhelming desire to get back to earth – literally so, to dig, to plant trees, to surround himself with flowers that he himself had grown. The most obvious characteristic of the houses that he built, or bought and fixed up in the course of his life, are the gardens he planned and planted. No matter how extraordinary the houses, the gardens he created around them surpassed the bricks and mortar. In George's case the gardens he made gave him the sense that he was living in isolation, on an island of his own making. "...it's great when I'm in my garden, but the minute I go out the gate I think: 'What the hell am I doing here?'"

"From the day I met him he was defiant," Olivia said, "and so determined that nothing was going to stop him from leaping as far as he could."

She was thinking of his words in the song "Run of the Mill": "How high will you leap?/ Will you make enough for you to reap it?/ Only you'll arrive – at your own made end/ With no one but yourself to be offended/ It's you that decides."

'George Harrison: Living in the Material World', by Olivia Harrison, edited by Mark Holborn, is published by Abrams on 3 October; the film will be out in cenmas for one night only on 4 October and the DVD is out on 10 October. Paul Theroux's latest book, 'The Tao of Travel', is published by Hamish Hamilton © Paul Theroux, 2011

Review: George Harrison: Living In The Material World (3/5)

Directed by Martin Scorsese

This lengthy and hagiographic portrayal of former Beatle George Harrison (who died in 2001) can't help but seem slightly anti-climactic by comparison with Scorsese's magnificent earlier documentaries and music films (most notably his Bob Dylan film 'No Direction Home'.) It also has a lop-sided feel. The first half, dealing with Harrison's Beatles years, is riveting. The second half, exploring its subject's mysticism, his involvement in HandMade Films and his later music ventures, such as The Traveling Wilburys, is markedly less gripping.

Scorsese and his team assemble their archive material (much of it never seen before) in virtuoso fashion. Early sequences exploring the Beatles' time in Hamburg will make essential viewing for all Beatles enthusiasts.

The brilliance of his songwriting notwithstanding, Harrison never escaped from his reputation as the quietest and most inscrutable of The Beatles. Scorsese's documentary makes us warm to his personality and talent without quite prising him out of the shadow that Lennon and McCartney still cast over him and his career after all these years.

Geoffrey Macnab
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Old Sep 23, 2011, 06:46 AM   #137
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Within Him, Without Him

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/ar...ld-on-hbo.html

TO the fans who thought they knew him George Harrison was both omnipresent and enigmatic. Of the four members of the world’s most famous band, the Beatles, Harrison made the least effort at being a public figure, and though he shared himself in recordings as disparate as the catchy pop of “Taxman,” the desolate strains of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” and an album of spiritual chants and music that he produced for the Radha Krishna Temple, he could be inscrutable and distant behind it all. Even as he sang “Got My Mind Set on You,” his consciousness seemed to be focused somewhere else entirely.

To Olivia Harrison, who married him in 1978 and remained with him until his death in 2001, her husband was contradictory in different ways. He was, she said recently, her “scoundrel yogi,” who partook of the pleasures of this life while he contemplated the next one. And he preserved nearly everything he experienced, whether he was recording his first sitar lesson with Ravi Shankar or retaining fully packed suitcases from trips abroad that he kept as time capsules. But he wasn’t concerned with how posterity would regard him.

“When he used to be asked how he’d like to be remembered, he said, ‘I don’t care, I don’t care if I’m remembered,’ ” Ms. Harrison said in an interview, affectionately imitating George’s clenched Liverpool accent. “And I really think he meant that. Not in a sarcastic way, but it’s like: Why do you have to be remembered? What’s the big deal?”

These many sides of Harrison — the artist and the archivist; the mystic and the mystery — are all on display in a new documentary, “George Harrison: Living in the Material World,” directed by Martin Scorsese, which HBO will show in two parts on Oct. 5 and 6.

Though the story of the Beatles has been told in many forms before, including in “The Beatles Anthology,” the documentary, record and book series released by Harrison, Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney beginning in 1995, “Living in the Material World” is a significant and substantially new take on the band and its most elusive member. It is the first film to center on Harrison, the so-called quiet Beatle, and the first time Mr. Scorsese, whose roster of rock documentaries is gradually rivaling his celebrated résumé of fiction features, has focused on the Beatles.

The three-and-a-half-hour documentary would be noteworthy simply for the scope of the material it uses to tell Harrison’s story, including previously unseen footage he kept in Friar Park, his massive estate in Henley-on-Thames, England, and new interviews with band mates, colleagues and loved ones like Eric Clapton, Tom Petty and Dhani Harrison, George and Olivia’s son.

As much as the documentary has to say about its subject it reveals an enduring kaleidoscope of perspectives on Harrison, who continues to fascinate and confound his admirers long after his death.

For Mr. Scorsese the project has allowed him to immerse himself in the life of a fellow artist who, like him, was never at rest.

Harrison’s songs “were not typical blues-based rock songs, they were different in their structure and content,” Mr. Scorsese wrote in response to questions sent by e-mail. “As a person he seemed to be always changing and moving towards one deep interest after another, whether music, meditation, movies or the restoration of the gardens at Friar Park.”

But for Ms. Harrison the film is a public unfurling of her husband’s life as well as her own, one that took her several years to become comfortable with.

On a late summer visit to the Trump International Hotel and Tower in Manhattan, Ms. Harrison, 63, was smartly attired and articulate but did not necessarily seem comfortable in the spotlight. Regarding her husband’s legacy, she said, “I have an overdeveloped sense of duty.” However, she added, “I’m not a celebrity.”

“I almost don’t want people to see it,” she said of the documentary, for which she is a producer and an interview subject. “It’s like showing everybody into your most private place.”

Though her continuing affection for Harrison was abundantly evident as she spoke, she was not blind to his past battles with substance abuse or the life he led before meeting her. Asked if she knew that a documentary about her husband would invariably require a recounting of the story behind “Layla,” Mr. Clapton’s lust ballad about Pattie Boyd, Harrison’s first wife (who later married Mr. Clapton), Ms. Harrison calmly placed her hands over her ears and began to sing, “La la la la la.”

With a laugh she said, “There were certain things that I know, with my life with George, did not define our lives.”

Still, she said, “if there’s going to be a film made about George, then the most important thing was that his essence be represented, and that’s what Marty has done.” She added: “And I know it’s truthful because it makes me squirm.”

Dating back to “The Beatles Anthology,” Ms. Harrison said her husband vowed he would do an anthology of his own. “When four people do a story,” she said, “it’s ‘Rashomon.’ ”

To that end Harrison had been saving decades’ worth of photographs, letters and memorabilia as well as footage recorded during numerous interviews or with his own cameras, in formats ranging from eight-millimeter film to digital video. But he was not able to realize his goal before he died of cancer at the age of 58.
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Old Sep 23, 2011, 06:47 AM   #138
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continued.....

Within months of his death, Ms. Harrison said, she started receiving requests from production companies that wanted to make a film about her husband’s life. In 2005 she saw Mr. Scorsese’s documentary “No Direction Home: Bob Dylan,” another weighty meditation on a different countercultural bard, and believed she had found the director to tell Harrison’s story.

In a filmography teeming with gangsters and low lifes, Mr. Scorsese has famously used rock music to stirring effect in the pop and doo-wop soundtracks of movies like “Mean Streets” and “Goodfellas.” His fanaticism for rock music has been further confirmed in documentaries like “The Last Waltz,” about the Band, and “Shine a Light,” about the Rolling Stones, though Mr. Scorsese said he did not strategize about when to make fiction or nonfiction films.

“It’s impossible for me to imagine not making films about music,” he said. “If you mean, why do you make documentaries in between fiction films, then I have to say that there’s no difference — it’s all following through from the same gesture.”

Already intrigued by the idea of a film about Harrison, Mr. Scorsese said he was won over in a meeting with Olivia Harrison where she showed him correspondence from her husband to his mother that was written when he was in his early 20s but that read like the words of a more mature and self-assured man.

“He was expressing the idea that he knew there was more to life and existence than wealth and fame,” Mr. Scorsese said. “That was a person I was interested in getting to know better.”

But getting Ms. Harrison to part even temporarily with her husband’s personal items or to speak about him on camera was another story altogether.

“I couldn’t let go of anything,” she said. “It was like: ‘We’d like to borrow a shirt. Could we have your entire wardrobe?’ ”

To accommodate her Nigel Sinclair, a producer of “Living in the Material World” who had worked previously with Mr. Scorsese on “No Direction Home,” and his company, Spitfire Pictures, set up a production team at the Harrison estate, scanning and digitizing materials provided by Ms. Harrison.

A second team, in New York, conducted its own research and sought out archival footage, while producers conducted interviews with longtime Beatles associates like the bassist and visual artist Klaus Voormann, who designed the cover of “Revolver”; the photographer Astrid Kirchherr, who took many of the earliest photos of the band; and the producer Phil Spector, who in 2009 was sentenced to 19 years to life for the murder of the actress Lana Clarkson.

Asked how the meeting with Mr. Spector was arranged, Mr. Sinclair said, “We were able to capture that interview before he was no longer available to us, which is a very euphemistic way of saying it, isn’t it?”

In other interviews seen in the documentary Mr. McCartney discusses a working relationship with Harrison that was not always an even partnership and could occasionally be contentious; the usually jocular Mr. Starr chokes up and sheds some tears; and Mr. Petty recalls a time when the excitable Harrison, who played with him in the Traveling Wilburys, showed up at his house with a trunkload of ukuleles.

Despite his supremely laid-back demeanor, Mr. Petty said that talking about Harrison on camera was an unexpected challenge.

“I’ve done thousands and thousands of interviews,” he said. “This one was particularly emotional, because that was my big brother. You don’t want to let someone like George be put into a small box, because he really was quite a person who covered a lot of ground.”

Ms. Harrison was among the last people to be interviewed, and in one of the film’s most gripping sections she discusses in detail a 1999 incident in which a man broke into the Harrisons’ home and stabbed her husband multiple times before the peaceful couple’s self-preservation instincts kicked in and they physically subdued the intruder.

“I didn’t think that should be a defining moment of George’s life,” Ms. Harrison said of the attack, “but in actual fact something really profound came out of that, and that was the reason to talk about it.”

It took about three years to edit the film, a process that continued while footage was still being gathered. Asked how he was able to direct a feature in which he could not predetermine every element to the same degree as in a fiction film, Mr. Scorsese (who was also working on the documentaries “Public Speaking” and “A Letter to Elia” during this time) offered an impressionistic response.

“Working with interviews and pre-existing images,” he said, means “patience, letting them speak.” Mr. Scorsese added: “Once one image is placed against another, once a particular song is paired with a particular set of images, you see how they interact, how they come to life. It’s something like the pieces of a DNA sequence coming together.”

Mr. Scorsese said that films like “Living in the Material World” were “no less important to me” than movies like “Mean Streets” or “Raging Bull.” But David Tedeschi, who edited “Living in the Material World” and worked previously with Mr. Scorsese on “No Direction Home,” said documentaries offered the director opportunities that even his fiction features could not.

“He can do things on these films that he can’t necessarily do on a commercial film,” Mr. Tedeschi said, whether that means not having to constrain the movie to a two-hour running time or taking as much time as he wishes to complete it.

For Ms. Harrison the documentary provides a different kind of satisfaction. Though she is also releasing a book, which shares the title “George Harrison: Living in the Material World” and contains many of her husband’s photos and letters, she described Mr. Scorsese’s film as “the definitive project for me.”

“I don’t think there’s anything more I can do,” she said. “That’s one reason I tried to just open up as much as I possibly can. You can’t do this again. Marty’s told this story. It’s a whole life from beginning to end.”

Though she remains a partner in Apple Corps Ltd., the Beatles’ company, and forever connected to the spouses and children of her husband’s band mates (whom she called “the most kind, embracing people in my life”), Ms. Harrison suggested that the documentary was closing a chapter in her life.

Having shared so much of herself and her husband in the film, she was asked, is she now entitled to the freedom to not have to keep doing it?

“Thank you very much for saying that,” Ms. Harrison replied. “You could just say that I said that.”
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Old Sep 23, 2011, 06:48 AM   #139
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Speaking for the Quiet Beatle: Olivia Harrison Discusses the George Harrison Film

http://news.google.com/news/more?q=t...ed=0CEUQqgIwAg

The four men who comprised the Beatles are, to the vast majority of us, larger-than-life figures who made a tremendous and lasting impact on music, film and fashion and in numerous other arenas of popular culture. But to a select few, they are just – or are also – people: friends, siblings, parents, husbands. Among the members of that exclusive club is Olivia Harrison, who married George Harrison in 1978 and remained with him until his death in 2001. Ms. Harrison, who is the mother of Harrison’s son, Dhani, does not consider herself a celebrity and does not fully embrace the spotlight, but she has become a guardian of her husband’s legacy and of the mementos and artifacts he left behind at Friar Park, their sizable estate in Henley-on-Thames, England.

Many of these letters and recordings – along with the lives of the people behind them – are revealed in a new Martin Scorsese documentary, “George Harrison: Living in the Material World,” which will be shown in two parts, on Oct. 5 and 6, on HBO. It is a film for which Ms. Harrison serves as an interview subject as well as a producer, and a project with which she is still trying to get comfortable. For an article about the documentary in this Sunday’s Arts & Leisure section, Ms. Harrison spoke about the development of the project, her life with George Harrison and how she learned to share it with the cameras. These are excerpts from that conversation.
Q.

How did you and Martin Scorsese first become connected on this project?
A.

I went to see “No Direction Home,” which I thought was brilliant. And some production companies were approaching me to do a documentary on George’s life. And I had so many requests, eventually, I thought, someone’s going to do this. Two months after he died, somebody wanted to do it. I really didn’t want someone who didn’t know George, who wasn’t involved with the family, to take on the project. Marty was approached, and he was very interested in George and interested in his journey. Marty’s really looking for the journey and the man.
Q.

Had you already started organizing George’s possessions and archives in preparation for a film?
A.

I had started gathering things, but it was always after the fact. It doesn’t usually happen that way, where you have an archive and then you do a project. I mean, normal people do that. People who are on top of life, I don’t know how they manage. George had wanted to do his own anthology, from the time the Beatles had their anthology in 1995. When four people do a story, it’s “Rashomon.” He had a series of cameras from the time I met him. Movie cameras, 8-mil cameras. DVs, Hi-8s, Super VHS, U-matics. He said once, “I’m stockpiling all this material for when I’m dead,” but this was 20 years ago. He just wanted to share what he loved with people and his friends.
Q.

When he would talk about his own death so matter-of-factly, was that just his morbid sarcasm?
A.

There wasn’t a real divide between life and death for George. Even though, yes, he was human and he wanted to live, he didn’t see it so defined. He saw similarities in the sacred and the profane, in life and death. But it wasn’t morbid at all. He wanted to make something fun. I decided to do what I knew he would have done.
Q.

So all these items of his – were you just keeping them in a vault in Friar Park?
A.

No vault. Lots of drawers, cupboards, roof space, basements. Just everywhere. Always cassettes, there were a lot of cassettes around. And one of them said, “Sitar lesson.” And it was 1966 and it was his first sitar lesson with Ravi Shankar. And you hear Ravi saying, “Now, for our first lesson…” To me, that’s just fantastic.
Q.

Were these items organized around the house in a deliberate way?
A.

I think it was thoughtful, but at the same time, there were so many drawers and so many rooms that he would just throw things in there and that’s what would stay. Occasionally I would find something and go, “Wow, look at this, what I found in the drawer.” And he’d say [stolidly] “I know it’s there. I put it there.” And I’d say, “Oh, O.K. So that’s why it’s there.”

Very often he wouldn’t unpack a suitcase, so there’d be like a time capsule. And you’d find a local currency, and souvenirs and Polaroids. He left – and I think this came from his mother’s house – a rusty tin box, and in the box was football cards and lyrics written in a very young hand. I didn’t want to disturb any of it.
Q.

Was it hard for you to part with all these personal items so that the movie could be made?
A.

Now, in hindsight, I see that they were very patient with me, because I couldn’t let go of anything. The production team came over, spent a lot of time and slowly pried things from my hands. We figured out a way to transfer all the home movies. I didn’t want to send them out anywhere. It was my life. So, we did that in the house. And one of my son’s school friends, who’s become our archivist and who knew George, he was around a lot of the time and transferred all the DVs.
Q.

Since George is no longer with us, do you feel you have an obligation to tell his story in his absence and to carry on his legacy?
A.

Honestly, I have an overdeveloped sense of duty, I think. It’s not what I want to do. It’s not a carrot for me, at all. In fact, this film is really making me want to go hide somewhere. It’s my life. Everybody says, “George, he was such a private person, why are you doing this?” And he was, but he was out there in the world. I know that he would have done his own story. By default, I have to be the one. I’m talking to you but I’m not talking to everybody and I’m saying, no, I do not want to be on television. I’m not a celebrity.
Q.

Is there a moment at which you have to overcome your desire for privacy and put yourself out there, if only for the sake of this documentary?
A.

The moment you’re talking about is now. I can’t say I’m really prepared. I almost don’t want people to see it. It’s like showing everybody into your most private place. But at the same time, I think it’s important. If there’s going to be a film made about George, then the most important thing was that his essence be represented and the truth be represented, and that is what Marty has done. And I know it’s truthful because it makes me squirm. [laughs]
Q.

Now that you’ve seen the documentary yourself, what do you think of it?
A.

Every time I see the first part, I think, “God, it’s so much about the Beatles. Why is this about the Beatles? It’s never going to end.” And then you realize: Exactly. That’s how Marty gives you the idea of how it must have felt. You’re never going to get out of this. And I think that’s brilliant storytelling.
Q.

You’re interviewed in the documentary but you’re also one of its producers. Were you telling Scorsese and his team how you wanted certain parts of the story told, or what you wanted them to stay away from?
A.

No, there were questions, like, “Why are you telling this story? Why is this so important?” I don’t know the filmmaking process. The whole point of having a director and a storyteller like Marty is to let him tell the story, and I am so glad that he did. Dhani was very helpful to me in – his feeling that the dark and the light, and the good and the bad have to be told. You can’t just have nice things.
Q.

You realize, of course, going into this that a Scorsese film about George Harrison will inevitably have to tell the story behind the creation of “Layla.”
A.

[pretends to cover her ears] La la la la la la. [laughs] There were certain things that I know, with my life with George, did not define our lives. Now maybe it defined a certain period of time, but in hindsight, you look back at things and think, What’s the big deal? You’re 23 years old. You look at a 22-year-old, a 23-year-old, and you say, O.K., well, you’re young. Is that really who defined me in life? There are certain things that I didn’t think should be so definitive of George’s life. Same with the attack on us. I didn’t think that should be a defining moment, but in actual fact, it was something really profound came out of that, and that was the reason to talk about it.
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cont....

Q.

Is it important to you that history preserve George in some way? Do there need to be projects like this from time to time that remind audiences who he was?
A.

No, I don’t feel people need to be reminded. I think one just hopes, as you would about anyone, that they don’t become caricatures of themselves. But when he used to be asked, how would you like to be remembered, he said, [imitates his clenched accent] “I don’t care, I don’t care if I’m remembered.” And I really think he meant that. Not in a sarcastic way, but it’s like, Why do you have to be remembered? What’s the big deal?
Q.

I can’t imagine a world where people don’t know who the Beatles are, and then I see anecdotal evidence that younger generations aren’t as interested in them or don’t know who they are. Could their music ever be forgotten?
A.

George’s music is there. He was a beautiful musician and he had a beautiful voice, and he had a fantastic touch on the guitar and I miss that touch. But I’m not doing it to promote him or to make him a legend, or try to make him anything. His music is there. I’m sure it goes for all musicians – how music can change someone’s life and really lead them somewhere. I think for George, he talked about the inner journey and that was very important to him, although he was yin-yang. He could hang with the best of them. [laughs] He was a scoundrel yogi. That’s what I loved about him, because he was honest. He was right up front about it. “I’m bad? O.K., I’m bad.”
Q.

He certainly seems like someone who did not do anything by half-measures.
A.

That’s really true. We knew a lot of racing drivers and it’s the same thing. You’re just not going to know how raucous you can get on a guitar until you crank it up to 10. So he lived life like that. He said, “I’m lucky, I’ve got a tilt mechanism.” And I used to look at him and go, “Well, your tilt mechanism goes beyond mine.” He felt he always knew when to come back, but it can be a dangerous way to live. Because he had an inner anchor and a very pronounced consciousness – not conscience, but consciousness – he knew: This was bad, I’ve got to get back. And maybe that was the Catholic guilt he was always trying to leave behind. Maybe he never did. Maybe that was the tilt mechanism, I don’t know.
Q.

Through the band you’re also connected to the extended Beatle family, the band members’ spouses and children. What’s your relationship like with them?
A.

They’ve been the most kind, embracing people in my life. The children, Paul’s family especially, I’m really close to them. Dhani’s close to the girls as well, and it’s an odd thing. They know what it’s like to have a dad, as a Beatle. With it comes certain baggage. They’re siblings, they understand, they get it. They roll their eyes at the same things. [laughs]
Q.

With the release of the documentary, does it feel like you’re closing a chapter in your life? Is this the last substantial thing you want to say about George?
A.

This is the definitive story. It is the definitive project for me. I don’t think there’s anything more I can do. That’s one reason I tried to just open up, as much as I possibly can. You can’t do this again. Marty’s told this story. It’s a whole life from beginning to end. There isn’t anything else to be done. There’s a lot of music that was never finished, beautiful tunes, beautiful guitar riffs, just vamping over and over, that I could listen to forever. But I don’t know what one does with that. I have some other projects I want to do, and they are sort of to do with George, but not overtly.
Q.

Does putting this film out there set you free? Is it a way of saying to the world, “I’ve dug deep into myself to give you this, but that entitles me to not have to keep doing it?”
A.

Thank you very much for saying that. You could just say that I said that.
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