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Old Apr 06, 2004, 03:26 PM   #1
jlennonfan4
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Default Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

While music executives continue to complain about dwindling sales, today's youth are rediscovering past favorites due to the popularity of low-cost online music services.

Few modern-era albums linger long on the catalog chart, but hits sets and vintage landmarks, especially Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon (listed for an unprecedented 1,390 weeks), show exceptional staying power. Perennials include Bob Marley's Legend, AC/DC's Back in Black and Queen's Greatest Hits. The Beatles, Dylan, Rolling Stones and Zeppelin are reliable sellers.

One of the arguments that many people have made concerning an alternative explanation for the decline in music sales is that today's music just isn't that good. A lot of people shrugged that off, though, as being typical snobbery of people who always think the music of their generation was better than the crap on the radio today. Well, now it seems that even many of today's kids are agreeing that music from decades past was much better than what's on the radio these days - and part of how they're figuring that out is by experimenting with such "classic" songs by downloading them online. They get their first taste from a band they like today mentioning their influences - and they also get a lot of pointers from their parents, an idea that's shocking to those of an older generation who made sure whatever they listened to was exactly what their parents didn't like. Read through the article, though, and see how many record execs are positively stunned that the kids today are actually sophisticated enough to know that the music they're pushing just isn't very good. One other interesting tidbit in the article answers some of the concerns from some that all this downloading will "unbundle" the album by getting kids interested in only downloading one song. Instead, kids are pointing out that the old albums are full of good songs, so they want the full albums. It's only when the albums are full of filler that people are willing to unbundle the album and just pick up a couple singles.

sources :
http://www.techimo.com/newsapp/i10503.html
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20040330/0046215.shtml


oh btw...
don't forget to read this article too :
http://www.wordsoup.com/word/archives/001158.html
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Old Apr 06, 2004, 03:59 PM   #2
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

Kids are listening to their parents
Their parents' music, that is

By Edna Gundersen, USA TODAY
Jamie Horton, 14, considers himself a fairly savvy music-loving teen. The Los Angeles ninth-grader trawls the Internet for rock discoveries and totes an iPod packed with 3,000 tunes.

The complaint about many modern albums is that many only contain one good song and a lot of filler. So kids are turning to classic rock, where the whole album is solid.


His favorite band? Queen. Not late-'90s rock outfit Queens of the Stone Age, not late-'80s metal band Queensryche and certainly not latter-day rap diva Queen Latifah.

Jamie reveres the glam-metal British quartet that flourished in the '70s with mock operatic Bohemian Rhapsody and the anthemic We Will Rock You.

"I don't like new wannabe punk like Good Charlotte," he says. "Led Zeppelin was the first old band I liked. Then Pink Floyd. Now it's The Who and Queen."

One contemporary band that he does appreciate is U.K. sensation The Darkness. Why? "They're similar to Queen."

Jamie is not alone in his obsession with the sounds of the '60s and '70s. Though difficult to quantify, the trend of youngsters craving oldies seems to be gaining momentum. Kids are snatching up Beatles and Led Zeppelin discs, flocking to ZZ Top and Steve Miller concerts, researching the troubled histories of Lynyrd Skynyrd and Black Sabbath and scouring their parents' record collections for Jimi Hendrix licks and Allman Brothers Band jams.

"I could be some of those people's grandpa," singer Gregg Allman, 56, says of his band's current flock. Celebrating its 35th year of touring and recording, the Allmans just wrapped up a nine-night stand at New York's Beacon Theater after releasing new double live album One Way Out. "We see kids out there, and we still have hippies," Allman says. "I don't see a gap between generations. It's all ages, all types. Kids usually say, 'I found out about you from my dad.' Or they ask for an autograph for their mama. That makes you feel dated, but we welcome them with open arms."

Wed to a rootsy blues-rock tradition, the Southern group never pandered to a younger demo, and Allman suspects it's that purity that drew teens to the fold.

"To last this long, you have to be the real thing," he says. "I don't have any gimmicks or fancy clothes or firecrackers. That stuff never crossed our minds. Genuine rock 'n' roll — the right phrasing of a drum beat and a bass guitar — can move your soul."

Allman and brother Duane, who died in 1971, found their direction by searching for the roots of music that flowered in the '60s. "We wanted to see what we missed, so we found Robert Johnson and Big Bill Broonzy," he says. "That's what kids are doing now, seeing where stuff came from."

'Yeah yeah yeah' to the Beatles

Beatles historian Martin Lewis began spotting a young wave of Fab Four fanaticism as emcee of Beatlefan conventions the past 14 years. Boomers constituted half of the audience in 1990. Now 75% of attendees are under 30, and many barely in their teens.

As marketing consultant for The Beatles Anthology, he met with label execs plotting campaigns targeting fans 45 and up. "I've got news for you," Lewis told them. "I'm the oldest guy at Beatlefan conventions."

Sure enough, a marketing survey showed that the under-30 constituency scooped up 40% of the first Anthology run. "I've interviewed those kids," Lewis says. "I've said, 'Surely you'd rather listen to Justin Timberlake. Why are you here? Were you forced by your parents?' But they chose to be there."

Teens saying "yeah yeah yeah" to The Beatles proves "we've sold younger kids short," says James Austin, vice president of A&R at Rhino/WMG, which specializes in reissues and retrospectives. "We tend to think they like only what's popular on radio."

In repackaging early rock, targeting fortysomethings was until recently his key strategy.

"In the past year, I've been asking myself how we can reach these younger fans," he says. "They're a hidden bonus. Kids today are a lot more sophisticated and more open than anyone realizes."

Catalog sales were up 17% last week over the corresponding week in 2003 and so far this year are 7.6% ahead of last year, according to Nielsen SoundScan. Classic rock accounts for a sizable chunk of the pop catalog chart, which tracks all albums more than three years old.

Although SoundScan doesn't identify buyers by age, industry observers detect a significant upswing of teen interest in oldies. The experts point to several factors that explain the trend of forward-thinking cyber kids reaching backward for music:

• Shifting attitudes. Self-respecting baby boomers dismissed their parents' Al Jolson, Glenn Miller and Frank Sinatra records as corny and dated. Kids now exhibit broader tastes rather than the Mod-or-Rocker mentality that divided British Invasion devotees.

"As long as it's good music, it doesn't bother me that my dad likes it too," Jamie says. "He took me to The Who, and that was easily the best concert I've been to."

He favors the "big music" of seminal rock because "the guitars wailed and lyrics had more meaning. Queen went overboard on everything. You don't hear singers like Freddie Mercury anymore." Mercury died in 1991. Jamie was 2.

In the '60s, coming of age meant reinventing pop culture, rejecting heritage and distrusting anyone older than 30. Not so now.

"There's not so much peer pressure to identify with a particular genre or even generation of music," says Jeremy Hammond, head of artist development at Sanctuary Records. "It's much more about defining one's own unique tastes. Back then, you had to choose a lifestyle associated with a genre. In England, you were in a gang of rockers or skinheads or Mods. Potheads wanted psychedelic music. Those boundaries are gone."

Classic-rock icons, like classical composers, defy fashion and "overshadow any perceptions of coolness," he says.

• New bands plowing an old field. Hip emerging bands freely emulate and name-check musical ancestors, kindling fan interest.

"So many new bands are flashing back," says Sean Ross of Edison Media Research. "White Stripes, The Darkness and Jet; it's all AC/DC. As music gets retro, kids get curious about the real thing."

When rising rock stars rave about The Kinks, sport Hendrix T-shirts or cover Bob Dylan songs, young fans investigate those roots, says Craig Kallman, president of Atlantic Records, home of the Led Zeppelin vault and current sensation The Darkness.

"We're seeing a resurgence of bands that have been inspired by the greatest rock bands of all time," Kallman says. "The Darkness embodies the spirit of Queen, Led Zeppelin and AC/DC with fundamentals that made those bands huge: great songs, a fantastic front man, incredible musicianship and a sense of fun. They counter the dark, angry, self-loathing nu-metal that has dominated alternative rock for so long."

Flamboyant rock stars, blistering guitar solos and hard-rock bombast "all went by the wayside as rap-metal took shape in the '90," Kallman says. When bands like The Darkness and Jet arrived, "the spontaneity, creativity, freedom and energy, all the elements that made rock such a defining sound, cut through to kids."

• Easy access. Classic rock is not only ubiquitous — in TV ads, reissues, reunion tours, soundtracks, copycat bands and recycled hits — but it's also instantly available. An obscure tune is only a few keystrokes away. "The Internet has turbo-charged the renewed interest in great bands of the past," Kallman says.

Finding rare gems used to mean scouring used record stores, garage sales and classifieds. Paid downloads and illegal file-sharing allow easy sampling and cherry-picking. Among the more popular digital tracks, according to SoundScan: Elvis Presley's A Little Less Conversation, Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody, Peter Gabriel's In Your Eyes and Elton John's Tiny Dancer.

"Kids want to experiment, and technology facilitates that," Austin says. "They don't have to shell out 18 bucks to try something. They can preview a track for 30 seconds, and buy it for 99 cents. I'm a big fan of the record store, but it's going to be a dinosaur."

Likewise for "stagnant" radio's narrow formats that don't cater to youth's eclectic palate, Austin says.

"Young listeners are reaching for something else, and they often find it in the past. Don't be surprised if they start checking out Frank Sinatra and Rosemary Clooney."

The Internet has turned grass-roots movements into brushfires as info-age addicts steer search engines toward rock's back roads. It's a phenom that recharges the fan bases of such perennials as the Rolling Stones, ZZ Top, David Bowie, Steve Miller and Lynyrd Skynyrd, whose best-of album is a fixture on Billboard's catalog chart.

"We started out appealing to the working-class blue-collar audience, and now we see their kids at our shows," Skynyrd guitarist Gary Rossington says, noting that teens in attendance aren't rookies.

"They know the words to every song, old or new, and they know our whole history," he says, referring to the deaths of three players in a 1977 plane crash. "I hear from younger fans who learn about us from the Internet or VH1 or their parents or maybe something Kid Rock said about us."

• The riches of rock's golden era. Few modern-era albums linger long on the catalog chart, but hits sets and vintage landmarks, especially Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon (listed for an unprecedented 1,390 weeks), show exceptional staying power. Perennials include Bob Marley's Legend, AC/DC's Back in Black and Queen's Greatest Hits. The Beatles, Dylan, Rolling Stones and Zeppelin are reliable sellers.

Why are kids taking nostalgia trips to their parents' playgrounds? Zeppelin's bait, says Kallman, is "mythic lifestyles and iconic personas. The music is grandiose and gentle, shaped by blues and heavy metal and textured by British folk and California psychedelia."

Plus, "they turned the amps up and played as loud as they could," says Jeffrey Logan, a junior at Los Angeles Center for Enriched Studies, where he founded a Zeppelin fan club called Led Heads.

Members gather to share and analyze classic rock on MP3s, burned CDs and DVDs. Though he admires such modern acts as the White Stripes, Jet, Green Day and Offspring, Jeffrey worships Hendrix, Black Sabbath, Kiss, Bowie, Pink Floyd, The Who, The Beatles and similar vets. And he has a whole lotta love for Led Zeppelin.

"Every single song had a unique and flamboyant riff," Jeffrey says. "I love the crazy guitar and Robert Plant's screaming voice. Their music is unpredictable and outrageous. It's a lost genre. We formed this club to spread the word."

Jeffrey, 17, doesn't mind that his heroes were also his parents' faves and that many of them are dead or eligible for Social Security. "They're just very cool old people," he says, adding wistfully, "I wish they were still young so I could experience them in their heyday. Music back in the day was about the sound, not about the image like it is now. New bands like Simple Plan and Rooney are kind of repetitive and wimpy. It's all going downhill."

• The paucity of contemporary rock idols. Oldies fill a void, says Kristin Clarke of Park Ridge, Ill.

"Before I listened to classic rock, there was nothing I really liked," says the Lincoln Middle School eighth-grader. "Every new band has one good song and the rest of the CD is garbage. On old rock albums, every song is great. I'm always hitting the repeat button."

Kristin, 13, got hooked through her brother's AC/DC and Kiss records, Pink Floyd cliques at school and Chicago's classic rock station, WLUP (The Loop).

"At first it was weird, but I became totally addicted," she says. "Aerosmith's my favorite. I think Steven Tyler is the coolest. Their stuff sounds so good, who cares how old they are? It's just fun."

Fun is one lure drawing young Americans to rock's golden years.

Today's music 'clouded by cynicism'

"Look at (the late Who drummer) Keith Moon's cheeky impudence," says Beatles expert Lewis. "Eddie Vedder's image suggests he'd cancel a tour if he broke a fingernail, it would be such a trauma. So much of original music today is clouded by cynicism, a blasι attitude, irony and flippancy.

"Young people like to feel uplifted, but the culture has a sneer on its face so they turn to music, albeit frozen in time, that has an exuberant optimism. Artists in the '60s and to a degree in the '70s dared to hope, perhaps naively, that things could get better. Teens should be joyous and optimistic. There's plenty of time to be bitter and twisted later."
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Old Apr 07, 2004, 04:06 AM   #3
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

I agree with that! Most of the music that's on the radio now i dont like all that much. And a lot of people at my school would tend to agree with me on that...Most people I talk to dont even listen to the radio anymore!
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Old Apr 07, 2004, 11:07 AM   #4
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

I loved the article - explained very well why I'm into old bands (the dinousaur ones, as some say in Brazil)...Nothing really new comes by the airwaves now - though it should!...


"Look at (the late Who drummer) Keith Moon's cheeky impudence," says Beatles expert Lewis. "Eddie Vedder's image suggests he'd cancel a tour if he broke a fingernail, it would be such a trauma(...)"

I couldn't help but laugh myself off when I read this - it's the truth and nothing more (forgive me, Pearl Jam fans...) [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]
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Old Apr 07, 2004, 02:04 PM   #5
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

[ QUOTE ]
I agree with that! Most of the music that's on the radio now i dont like all that much. And a lot of people at my school would tend to agree with me on that...Most people I talk to dont even listen to the radio anymore!

[/ QUOTE ]

Same here! I can't stand the garbage that's on Top 40 radio now. I usually have one of the two oldies stations on, or the news station--that's it. It's either that or my CDs (and lately the more silence I can get after coming home from work, the better!)
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Old Apr 15, 2004, 12:07 PM   #6
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

Very True! Talented artists/groups are far and few in between today. I like a few rock bands (Evanescense, The Darkness, Radiohead), but the majority of what I listen to comes from the past. I like stuff from the 50s to the 80s pretty much. I do like to try to keep an open mind and I like at least a few songs from most genres of music, but my main love is rock from the 60s. I completely and absolutely hate today's pop music! (Britney, 50 Cent and friends) ughhh!!! I like to call it "Commericial Music", but then again it's not music, it's a easy/talentess moneymaker for the record execs . I could go on for hours about how it's rubbish and lacks everything, but I'll spare ya. ::):
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Old Apr 15, 2004, 12:46 PM   #7
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

[ QUOTE ]
PotatoBeatle Posted:
...but the majority of what I listen to comes from the past...
...I completely and absolutely hate today's pop music! (Britney, 50 Cent and friends)...

[/ QUOTE ]
The only music that I like of today's music is Michelle Branch. I don't even listen to her that much. The Beatles are in my cd player 24-7.
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Old Apr 15, 2004, 03:11 PM   #8
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I like some of today's music enough to buy - Moby and Badly Drawn Boy, for example - but I'm always left with a feeling that I've heard it all somewhere before. Pop/rock is a worked-out seam. It's all been done before - much of it by The Beatles - and is doomed to repeat itself endlessly. It's the same thing that happened to jazz. There are lots of great jazz musicians around now, but they're only digging in the same ground as their musical forebears.

The dance/rap/whatever-label-they-happen-to-be-putting-on- the-same-old-crud-this-week thing amuses me. When I was a kid my parents used to call The Beatles or whoever else I happened to be listening to "jungle music." The irony is that the label can actually be applied to dance/rap stuff with some justification. It has much in common with the first rhythmic thump and chant produced by those demi-humans who discovered how to get odd sounds by hammering a tree trunk and warbling, and even serves much the same ritual functions.

Rap: playground chant for people who don't know how to grow up and listen to proper music.
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Old Apr 15, 2004, 06:34 PM   #9
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

[ QUOTE ]
PetePointon Posted:
Rap: playground chant for people who don't know how to grow up and listen to proper music.

[/ QUOTE ]



Great articles! I personally can't stand 99% of the music coming out today. I would so much rather listen to the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix etc. than anything that they are releasing now (most of which I don't even consider music)
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Old Apr 16, 2004, 01:11 AM   #10
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

I'm sure everyone here who has said they dont like todays music are saying the same thing their parents/grandparents said about your taste in music all those years ago.
I'm sure most kids out there love the current music scene and quite right they are too.There is fantastic music still being made if you look beyond the charts!
I can go to a club to see a band every week and it doesn't matter if its pop,rock,rap etc....It's Music!!
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Old Apr 16, 2004, 04:31 AM   #11
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I'd never say there isn't good music being made, but there's something of a Parkinson's Law principle in action: as the industry has expanded, so has the proportion of dross being produced. Add to this that the advances in recording technology rather than freeing the imaginations of musicians has led to homogeneity by taking away much of the spontaneity enegendered by working within limitations. Plus the ideas are all used up! There's a limit to what you can do with X-number of notes, in harmony, counterpoint or whatever, and it was reached years ago.

The last band I remember as having any overt level of originality was The Smiths.
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Old Apr 16, 2004, 05:22 AM   #12
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

I don't know. I think there was just as much crappy music made in the 60's as there is today. It's just that only the good stuff survived the test of time so that you still keep hearing it.

And there's a lot of great music still being made today, it's just not what's being played on mainstream radio, so you have to search a little harder for it.
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Old Apr 16, 2004, 07:36 AM   #13
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Certainly there was dross produced in the 60s, but as Cliff Richard once told me (namedropping necessarily here!), "We all had to work harder because literally every week a couple of classic records came out, sometimes even more than that." As time has worn on the ideas have been used up and it's become harder to produce a "classic", so producers have turned to generic styles, putting out massive quantities of the same thing in the hope that it hits.

Innovation is positively discouraged, and bands are expected to stick to the same sound/style. A classic example is REM, once an interesting band but now producing essentially the same album over and over again, either because they've run out of ideas or, more likely, because they're afraid to alienate their fan base. Which, incidentally, is just what happened to Blur when they veered away from the cheery Britpop that made them famous in favour of a stripped-down sound. They got better - but the audience didn't go with them.
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Old Apr 16, 2004, 08:38 PM   #14
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

You're right!
There's great music being made today!
It's called....REMASTERS
:P
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Old Apr 16, 2004, 09:26 PM   #15
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Default Re: Kids : \"Today\'s Music Sucks\"

[ QUOTE ]
PetePointon Posted:
Innovation is positively discouraged..

[/ QUOTE ]

couldn't it be argued that for the most part innovation was discouraged in the pre-Beatles early 60s as well?
a very basic history of early Rock: it seems like Rock and Roll was very underground prior to Elvis. I found an old article from about 1954 or 55 that stated that the only types of kids who listed to rock and roll "non-music" were blacks and "poor white" kids. Elvis comes along and it hits main stream. eventually it becomes play it safe, those record execs that we love to hate thought they had figured out the formula and what did you get? Frankie Avalon, Fabian , etc. Buddy Holly's death and Elvis going into the army couldn't have helped either.
It didn't start getting good again until the Beatles and the groups that followed came along- and even then the Beatles were almost stopped. Consider "Guitar groups are on their way out" at Decca and good ol' boy Dave Dexter at Capitol records chose old, safe crap over a new sound from England. (just like today too! in the US it seems like non-American acts are ridiculously ignored! sound familiar?)
I ran across an interview with a teenager from Feb 1964- it was when the Beatles had first come to the US. He was probably in his late-teens and he was saying that music had been so horrible the last few years that he was exstatic to see something new like the Beatles finally come along. i was fascinated by it b/c i feel the same way only retrospectively, of course.
Sure there are plenty of great songs from the early 60s just as there are plenty of great songs today- but IMO there could be more if innovation wasn't discouraged as Pete put it.

sorry for the rattling, what i'm getting at is its not like we haven't seen this kind of stiffling before. I can't help but think that what we are seeing today is so similar to the very early 60s (as one example), its just lasted a LOT longer! IMO what we need is another Elvis, another Beatles. We got (arguably) minor versions with Nirvana and Eminem but their impact obviously wasn't enough to jolt any major long term changes.
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Old Jul 03, 2009, 05:47 AM   #16
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Default mhmm.

I agree with this topic, i'm still in my teen years, and I can't seem to get enough of the 60's, 70's or 80's. Bands like, The Atlantics, The Thorts, The Easybeats, Led Zepp, Pink Floyd, Jimmy Hendrix, Duran Duran and so many more.

The band that pretty much tops off all other bands is, The Doors, fucking legend Jim was, Ray was amazing, playing Bass Keyboard, Keyboard AND even taking over a peformance, and becoming lead singer, that's talent right there.
Robby was a great guitarist, good slide
John, was just overall a really great drummer.
Best song by The Doors would have to be... Who Do You Love or Unhappy Girl. (Live version at the matrix '67)
That's, to be, there best live peformance ever.
LONG LIVE 60'S - 80'S
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Old Jul 03, 2009, 09:57 PM   #17
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There's crap and good stuff in every era. As much as I love 60s rock, there were some songs I never liked. I was never overly fond of Motown and I could not stand the 4 Tops and can't to this day. I hated the word salad "Name Game" with the heat of 1000 suns and to this day I just can't listen to it. There was one other song that had and continues to have an adverse effect on me to the point where I just can't listen to it.

As for good stuff, it's out there.
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Old Jul 03, 2009, 10:04 PM   #18
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I like Amy Winehouse stuff. I just wish she could get her act together and put out more stuff.
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Old Jul 21, 2009, 01:21 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PetePointon View Post
Certainly there was dross produced in the 60s, but as Cliff Richard once told me (namedropping necessarily here!), "We all had to work harder because literally every week a couple of classic records came out, sometimes even more than that." As time has worn on the ideas have been used up and it's become harder to produce a "classic", so producers have turned to generic styles, putting out massive quantities of the same thing in the hope that it hits.

Innovation is positively discouraged, and bands are expected to stick to the same sound/style. A classic example is REM, once an interesting band but now producing essentially the same album over and over again, either because they've run out of ideas or, more likely, because they're afraid to alienate their fan base. Which, incidentally, is just what happened to Blur when they veered away from the cheery Britpop that made them famous in favour of a stripped-down sound. They got better - but the audience didn't go with them.


I agree with Rellvart that there was crap in the 1960's as there was in every decade. And come on man, to quote Cliff bloody Richard!!!!!! is taking the piss no? A guy who has produced crap since he first came on the scene (ok, Move It was good).
And so wrong with REM, they followed the massive selling Automatic For The People, almost a folk album with the grunge of Monster. How is that the same album over and over.
As for Blur, the albums they put out after Parklife all got to number 1.
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Old Jul 21, 2009, 01:38 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Matt@TheDoors View Post
I agree with this topic, i'm still in my teen years, and I can't seem to get enough of the 60's, 70's or 80's. Bands like, The Atlantics, The Thorts, The Easybeats, Led Zepp, Pink Floyd, Jimmy Hendrix, Duran Duran and so many more.

The band that pretty much tops off all other bands is, The Doors, fucking legend Jim was, Ray was amazing, playing Bass Keyboard, Keyboard AND even taking over a peformance, and becoming lead singer, that's talent right there.
Robby was a great guitarist, good slide
John, was just overall a really great drummer.
Best song by The Doors would have to be... Who Do You Love or Unhappy Girl. (Live version at the matrix '67)
That's, to be, there best live peformance ever.
LONG LIVE 60'S - 80'S
((((hugs Matt))))

I'm the biggest Doors fan here! I love the early stuff the most, especially "Unhappy Girl," and I'll take either the Matrix version or the studio version. I agree about the high caliber musicianship of Ray and Robby, and John was one of the most theatrical drummers I've ever heard. Few could follow along with whatever Jim might come up with onstage as he was rather unpredictable, and Johnny D was always right there.

Oddly, the Matrix sounded like a rather sedate Doors performance to me. I think it's because it was one of the first times they weren't playing on their own turf, but were in the rival city of San Francisco. Plus, it was still early in their career, and were largely unknown off the Sunset Strip, so not a lot of feedback from the audience. (I thought Jim was adorable when he said "We'll be right back." )

I also love the Easybeats' "Friday on my Mind." Would like to find more from them and some of the "garage bands" of the '60's.
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