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Old Sep 11, 2012, 06:03 PM   #81
Maia 66
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A lovely story from their time in Japan:


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THE LIGHTER

Karuizawa is an old summer resort in Japan very much like the Hamptons except it’s in the mountains. There is a coffee house in a pine forest near Karuizawa. John & I fell in love with the place, and found ourselves going there almost every day with Sean. To get there, you had to go cycling for about 30 minutes from the town of Karuizawa. But we loved going there. There was a big hammock in the backyard, and John, Sean and I used to spend the afternoon lying in it, giggling, singing, and watching the sky.

After John’s passing, five years from the time we were last there together, I visited the coffee shop again. It was as if time had stood still. There was the same stillness in the shop with only a few people sitting around. The scent of pine and aroma of good coffee was in the air. I had a cup of coffee and left. The owner came running after me and handed me a lighter. “Your husband left this the last time he was here,” he said. I looked at him and the lighter. “I’d like to return this to you.” I lit the lighter. The flame shot up, like it was alive. Then I remembered the day that John had left the lighter at the coffee house.

The three of us went there to spend the afternoon as usual. Right in the middle of our bike ride home, John remembered that he had left the lighter at the coffee house. I was going fast on my bike. He was shouting something to me from behind. “What?” I shouted. “I left me lighter at the coffee house!” John shouted back. “The one I bought yesterday!” I knew he liked that one. I slowed down and turned my head around. “Shall we go back to get it?” I asked. “Yeah, let’s,” he said. Then he changed his mind “Oh, never mind. I’ll get it tomorrow when we’re there,” he said.

But tomorrow never came. The rainy season started the next day. It rained cats and dogs for several days without stopping.

Karuizawa was not fun when that started. John just sat in the hotel room and made collages. Then we packed and left for Tokyo, then home to N.Y.

We got busy with other things and, as fate would have it, we never went back there again. I was left with the lighter.

“Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.” JL

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Old Sep 11, 2012, 06:52 PM   #82
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I'd like to re-post 4iiiis's statement at the very beginning of this thread, because it echos my sentiments exactly:

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Because, as John fans, some of us have put up with decades worth of mud flung on this lady. Some of us don't care for her, others just tolerate her, but I know we are all intelligent enough to know that spreading HATE and negativity towards a person who made John happy isn't the coolest way to go about. I'm making this thread to show Yoko some love. She is almost 80 and she and John were the loves of each other's lives. I, for one, have grown in my appreciation of her over the years.
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Old Sep 11, 2012, 08:11 PM   #83
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Thumbs up One of my favorites...

Originally, this song can be found on her album Rising, but this is a remix she did with Cat Power that I really dig.



REVELATIONS

Bless you for your anger,
It's a sign of rising energy.
(transform the energy to versatility and it will bring you prosperity)

Bless you for your sorrow,
It's a sign of vulnerability.
(transform the energy to sympathy and it will bring you love)

Bless you for your greed,
It's a sign of great capacity.
(transform the energy to giving,
Give as much as you wish to take and you will receive satisfaction)

Bless you for your jealousy,
It's a sign of empathy.
(transform the energy to admiration
And what you admire will become part of your life)

Bless you for your fear,
It's a sign of wisdom.
(transform the energy to flexibility and you will be free from what you fear)

Bless you for your search of direction.
(transform the energy to receptivity and the direction will come to you)

Bless you for the times you see evil.
(evil feeds on your support. feed not and it will self-destruct.
Shed light and it will cease to be)

Bless you for the times you feel no love.
Open your heart to life anyway
In time you will find love in you.

You are a sea of goodness,
You are a sea of love.
Bless you, bless you, bless you,
Bless you for what you are.

Count your blessings ev'ry day for they are your protection
Which stand between you and what you wish not.

Count your curses and there will be a wall
Which stand between you and what you wish.

The world has all that you need
You have the power to attract what you wish.
Wish for health, wish for joy,
Remember, you are loved.

The world has all that you need
And you have the power to attract what you wish.
Wish for health, wish for joy,
Remember, you are loved.

I love you


So much truth...
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Old Sep 11, 2012, 08:17 PM   #84
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Thank you for your posts. I love Cat Power! I didn't know she had worked with Yoko.

And that song could not be more perfect for today.
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Old Sep 11, 2012, 08:28 PM   #85
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Flawless choice of song, Scruffie!

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Old Sep 11, 2012, 08:33 PM   #86
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Bless you for your fantastic taste in music and class lyrics. Yoko broke my heart with this one. I remember I bought it when I was just beginning to delve into her art. It was a 'revelation' for real. Honestly, there is a genuineness in these thoughts. Nothing about them has any of the inkling of the business-minded Yoko. This is her heart and her head giving us their all.
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Old Sep 11, 2012, 08:35 PM   #87
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It also shows a wisdom and a deep compassion. It's actually very spiritual... reflecting on the lyrics is a cleansing experience.
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Old Sep 11, 2012, 08:38 PM   #88
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Originally Posted by Maia 66 View Post
It also shows a wisdom and a deep compassion. It's actually very spiritual... reflecting on the lyrics is a cleansing experience.
It's beautiful. I have the original, which is my preference. I think I may ask Mr. Apple Scruff to, maybe, make it into an mp3 for those on here who will appreciate this kind of beautiful message. It's open, honest, deep, and YES spiritual. I always have loved it.
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Old Sep 11, 2012, 08:49 PM   #89
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I think I may ask Mr. Apple Scruff to, maybe, make it into an mp3 for those on here who will appreciate this kind of beautiful message.
Yes! Send it to me if he does!
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Old Sep 11, 2012, 08:56 PM   #90
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Originally Posted by Maia 66 View Post
Yes! Send it to me if he does!
Oh you know I will.
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Old Sep 12, 2012, 09:23 AM   #91
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gk.
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Old Sep 12, 2012, 08:12 PM   #92
Maia 66
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Gawd, I love that song... and I really love what that Alvaro dude did with it... I love his version of the song, and the animation is awesome!!!
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Old Sep 14, 2012, 06:38 AM   #93
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actually alvarortega is the animator..los escarabajos (translate - the beetles, bet you knew that though) is the band.

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Old Sep 14, 2012, 07:35 AM   #94
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Because, as John fans, some of us have put up with decades worth of mud flung on this lady. Some of us don't care for her, others just tolerate her, but I know we are all intelligent enough to know that spreading HATE and negativity towards a person who made John happy isn't the coolest way to go about. I'm making this thread to show Yoko some love. She is almost 80 and she and John were the loves of each other's lives. I, for one, have grown in my appreciation of her over the years.
Can we dial down the vitriol and hyperbole towards the non fans? Quit using the word "hate". It's a word attributed to insane maniacs like Adolf Hitler. Nobody wants to march Yoko into an oven. Nobody's "spreading" anything. Quit using a "love/appreciation" thread to insult and vilify people that are not like minded w yourself.

Now let's resume w the love!

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Old Sep 15, 2012, 12:41 PM   #95
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Originally Posted by wallrus59 View Post
los escarabajos (translate - the beetles, bet you knew that though) is the band
lol ~ Yes... I've been calling them that since the '70s, when I asked my 8th Grade Spanish teacher how to say "beetle" en español.

From Yoko's latest Twitter Q & A.

Q: Hello, Yoko! Have you heard Bob Dylan’s new album, “Tempest“? If so, what do you think of “Roll On John”? Love, April
A: I think if John is hearing it, he must be loving it. Thank you, Bob.
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Old Oct 20, 2012, 07:29 PM   #96
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Default Yoko Ono: A Reconsideration by Lisa Carver

This essay was included in this weekend's New York Times magazine. It came from from Lisa Carver's Reaching Out With No Hands: Reconsidering Yoko Ono.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/21/ma...ted=1&src=dayp
---------------------
Yoko Ono is not pretty, she is not easy, her paintings aren’t recognizable, her voice is not melodious, her films are without plot and her Happenings make no sense. One of her paintings you are told to sleep on. One of her paintings you are told to burn. One of her paintings isn’t a painting at all — it’s you going outside and looking at the sky. Most of her stuff is not even there. This is why I love her. This is why we need her. We have too much stuff already. It clutters our view, inward and outward.

We need more impossible in our culture. Go out and capture moonlight on water in a bucket, she commands. Her art is instructions for tasks impossible to complete. We already have a billion lovely things and a million amazing artists who have honed their talent and have lorded it above us. People who have achieved the highest of the possible. People wearing their roles as artist or writer or filmmaker or spokesman as a suit of armor or as an invisibility cloak or as an intimidatingly, unacquirably tasteful outfit.

Even other artists can’t figure out Ono or accept her as legit, nor can she obey the club rules. Her stuff is all wrong. She tells you to spend a whole year coughing. Listen to a two-minute song of recorded silence, music lovers. As for you, the most imperialist and arms-profiteering superpower in the history of the world, give peace a chance.

There are two schools of art. One is what is made beautiful by the artist; the other is to make way for the viewer to see or feel what is already beautiful.

The first is to make something ornate and unreachably special with skills. The viewer or listener is awed, their belief regarding the order of things is confirmed and they are reminded by this unachievable beauty of their own powerlessness. And I do love that kind of art, the beautiful kind.

The other way to make art is to tear down what’s between us and nature, us and eternity, us and the realization that everything is already perfect. In this experience of art, the viewer or listener loses respect for the current order or arrangement of civilization and thus becomes powerful, like King Kong, and outside civilization, like God — or simply like the shuffling janitor who is pleased with his own work and sleeps well.

I always admired the Japanese use of negative space in decorating and the unspoken in conversations (or so I gather from old films). Ono uses the negative positively. She is a classically trained operatic student who uses silence or screeches in her singing; a recipient of coveted gallery showings who hangs unpainted canvases with requests for you to pound holes in them or to walk on them. She was the first woman admitted to the philosophy program at Gakushuin University in Tokyo, and could travel the world discoursing multisyllabically, yet instead she tries lying in bed and not lifting a finger to cure a war.

It takes an enormous lack of ego to not put your imprint on everything you do, to not employ your learning and position. To stand back, to hold back, to keep your mouth shut. To yell with your silence, when you know you very well could make soothing and welcomed sounds at the drop of a hat. She could sing; she knows how. And being a Beatles wife could have been a magic charm — but she wasn’t interested. It takes willpower to overpower the will to power. To be accepted, to be thought nice, is traditionally woman’s power. That is something Ono doesn’t need.

She uses nonexistence in art, and she uses absence in her private life. Her first husband was the composer Toshi Ichiyanagi. They grew apart then flew apart. Her second husband, the film producer and promoter Tony Cox, same thing. Only he took their daughter, Kyoko, and hid with her, joining a religious cult.

At first Ono allowed her third husband, John Lennon, to do what came naturally to him: to hunt for the lost daughter through private detectives and the courts. Only after John’s death, when Ono wrote an open letter to her grown daughter, saying how deeply she loved her but that “you should not feel guilty if you choose not to reach me” and that she would no longer try to locate Kyoko, did her daughter slowly come back into her life.

It’s paradoxical, but it seems that when you accept loss, it loses its tenacity to stay lost. Ono wived by letting husbands go; she mothered her daughter by letting her go. Lennon got the urge to roam, and she told him: Go! Go roam! And he did, and then he called and said he wanted to come home, and she said, No, you’re not ready. Ono believes in the right to drift. She didn’t want to hold down and lay claim on human beings any more than she did her art and ideas.

Everything that has happened to Ono has caused her to become better at living outside of the culture (instead of trying to get in). She is out there in the lonely wide open — from being a silenced daughter to a war transplant to an expatriate to an unpopular artist to a feminist with few female friends to a lover blamed by the world for the breakup of its favorite band to losing her daughter to a cult to losing her husband to a killer. She manages all these losses and holds her ground. She is not swept away. She tries to find beauty, and she tries to find connection, and she knows the pain of loneliness that is in all of us even though we might not be aware of it. But she is aware, and she reaches to that place in us, she wants us to know it’s O.K. We will be O.K. Everything is all right.

Ono has made a career and a life out of doing exactly what she was not supposed to do and not being what she was supposed to be. And when she does tell us what to do, it’s the undoable. Because if you cannot do that, what else might you not do? The possibilities ofthe impossible are endless!
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Old Oct 20, 2012, 07:30 PM   #97
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Default continued...

So . . . if I love her so much, why does this little old lady still make me so uncomfortable?

I am a huge Yoko Ono fan. I feel that what she does in art — tries to free people — is the most important thing you can do in life, period. And I love that she always does it, bravely, no matter who or what it goes against, no matter how much further her unusual and uncompromising methods might drive her from our bosoms.

Even now, at the most acceptable point her career or private life has ever reached in our moralistic and artistically anorexic society, who is embracing her? Courtney Love and Lady Gaga. And those women seem nuts. They’re extreme. We all love to watch what they do next, but who really likes them? And while they catfight then make up and champion or co-opt other famous ladies, I never get the feeling they like anyone either. It’s more like the lonely and the aggressive recognizing one anotherand choosing not to expend their energy trying to destroy one another. (Maybe I watch too many Godzilla movies.)

Back to Yoko Ono. I feel such intense appreciation for her, yet it is not a warm feeling. At some level I just don’t understand her. It would please me so much if I could — it fills me with suppressed wariness that I don’t. I don’t judge anyone, yet I judge her. How could she sell the rights to make John Lennon-branded neckties? Or Lennon-themed children’s clothes by Carter’s? Doesn’t she have enough money already? She keeps her own stuff uncommercialized; why not similarly protect her husband’s legacy?

How could she not support Julian Lennon when he was not named in his father’s will — he’d already been abandoned by his father in life; why make him abandoned in his father’s death as well?

Why is she so wonderful in disinterested ways — communicating love to people she’s never met, paving a hard path to peace inside and out for the loneliest of the lonely among us — yet sometimes so mean in a personal way?

I care about her. She puzzles me. There are areas where I wish she made different decisions, and it bothers me, but still I’m rooting for her. Then it bothers me that she bothers me; there’s something wrong with me in that equation.

Female artists in our society (in every society?) have to be somehow accessible. Ono’s not. Just when you think you understand her feelings on things, like when she put Lennon’s smashed glasses on her album cover, you feel her vulnerability, you soften, then suddenly you find out she’s been living with another man while she’s been talking and singing about the murder of her husband, and you deem this disrespectful to both men. Then you feel guilty that you were intrusive about how a widow mourns or how an artist alchemizes pain. Then you step back, abashed, and then you’re back to Square 1: She’s not accessible. Not figure-out-able. She is so weird. She’s not endearing.

So what’s wrong with the fact that I can’t relate to her? I don’t relate to male artists or expect them to be my friends. It’s all about the work. I don’t need to examine the human being to admire what they created. Which is lucky, because male artists don’t typically seem to let that — whether or not I imagine I would like them as people — get in the way of their work.

But women do let it get in the way. Men are allowed to express all kinds of things, and it is not thought of as impacting their ability to provide as fathers. Women, though — everything they think and do and are proves their worth or danger as mothers and wives. But not with Ono. “Mothers are not supposed to give guidance,” she said in a 1998 interview, believing instead that children should do their own thing. I don’t think I’ve ever heard anyone before proposing mothers should not guide their children. How different. How refreshing. And Ono’s had to deal with kidnapping, deportation, assassination — yet she absorbs it all and still says what she believes is true, not what will make her look like a good woman to the public.

This is why, for me, Yoko Ono is the ultimate feminist. She isn’t fighting for women’s rights per se, but she expresses herself doggedly and with a single-minded purpose of art for art’s sake, truth for truth’s sake, and doesn’t seem to care what anyone thinks about her as a woman. Just as male artists do and we don’t think anything of it. She’s an artist, not a female artist. Her life — and those of the people around her — is a tool. She uses incredibly personal autobiographical details in her work, yet she doesn’t seem to feel any need for perfect factual order or to worry about anyone’s feelings. That quality is neither feminine nor masculine; it’s genius, which is always disturbing when peered at too closely but more so when it’s housed in the body of a woman, who should be maternal, who is supposed to be desirable, agreeable, likable.

That is the ultimate feminism: Yoko Ono doesn’t need us to like her. She doesn’t care.

Then sometimes I think she does care.

Oh, Yoko, you trouble me so.
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Old Oct 21, 2012, 05:54 PM   #98
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Thank you Maia for sharing this in here. I really appreciated aspects of it, but there were some parts that I wasn't certain the point being made, for example:

Quote:
Female artists in our society (in every society?) have to be somehow accessible. Ono’s not. Just when you think you understand her feelings on things, like when she put Lennon’s smashed glasses on her album cover, you feel her vulnerability, you soften, then suddenly you find out she’s been living with another man while she’s been talking and singing about the murder of her husband, and you deem this disrespectful to both men. Then you feel guilty that you were intrusive about how a widow mourns or how an artist alchemizes pain. Then you step back, abashed, and then you’re back to Square 1: She’s not accessible. Not figure-out-able. She is so weird. She’s not endearing.
Maybe I'm too progressive in my thinking than some, but I never considered over-scrutinizing Yoko's actions after John's death. Considering the woman that she was, her handling of her emotions and private life seemed perfectly in character. And, frankly, as far as her living with a man and ever, ever thinking that grieving for her dead husband through song and art was "disrespectful" to said man...um, come again? There is absolutely NOTHING disrespectful about missing your loved one openly. And if the person she was with thought so, he most likely wouldn't have stuck around.

Yoko's love for John transcends all the decades and is still going strong. There are a lot of women who are given the task of protecting their husband's legacy, but very few have done so as diligently or as lovingly as her. And she is John ftw. She doesn't mess around, which is what I respect for much about her.

Another thing I wanted to add: does everyone agree that all female artists need to be accessible? I can think of so many I adore that really aren't. It's an interesting thought and I would very much love to discuss with you good people.
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Old Oct 21, 2012, 10:11 PM   #99
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does everyone agree that all female artists need to be accessible?
No, of course I don't... but I think her point was that in society in general people are not as accepting of "out there" female artists as they are of the males. You are cool and tuned in, but as Lisa Carver writes in the essay, "our moralistic and artistically anorexic society" is not, so most people are not as open-minded as you.

An example. Did you ever watch that show that used to run on the Sundance Channel, Iconoclasts? Great show. Well, they had this one episode about Quentin Tarantino and Fiona Apple, who are friends and mutual admirers. Both are at least a little "out there"... but he is wildly popular and people write her off because they think she's "weird" or something... even though she's friggin' brilliant!

I have to disagree with you that Lisa Carver was "over-scrutinizing Yoko's actions after John's death." In fact, I really liked this essay because it mirrors how I feel and have felt about Yoko. I love her and admire her, but some of the things she does make me scratch my head.. not because I'm over-scrutinizing, but because she's just not at all predictable. And that's definitely a good thing. She's a true original... I may not agree with her 100% of the time and she may not inspire the affection that John did, but I believe she is genuine and provocative in a positive, forward-thinking way. But sometimes she does things that put me off... But she doesn't need to be what I want her to be. She just needs to be Yoko.
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Old Oct 22, 2012, 04:24 PM   #100
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Thumbs up EXCELLENT article and point Maia

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I have to disagree with you that Lisa Carver was "over-scrutinizing Yoko's actions after John's death." In fact, I really liked this essay because it mirrors how I feel and have felt about Yoko. I love her and admire her, but some of the things she does make me scratch my head.. not because I'm over-scrutinizing, but because she's just not at all predictable. And that's definitely a good thing. She's a true original... I may not agree with her 100% of the time and she may not inspire the affection that John did, but I believe she is genuine and provocative in a positive, forward-thinking way. But sometimes she does things that put me off... But she doesn't need to be what I want her to be. She just needs to be Yoko.
Perfectly stated. This is what I like to read from those who may not be Yoko die-hards. Admitting that she baffles you and that the things she does sometimes make no sense is a huge thing. Yoko really doesn't care who she confuses, and she won't bother to explain herself if you ask her to. But for many of us who love and admire her, there are moments of absolute preciousness, tenderness, and complete sincerity that blow me away. She isn't afraid to risk all of herself for her art and what it means to her, yet more and more the things she penetrates through her work are those of beauty, love, peace, hope. How anyone can trash-talk a person who cares enough to bring positive in the world is still a mystery to me.

I appreciated this article a lot. Thank you Maia. More of this everyone. More of this.
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